Captain Fantastic


Comedy / Drama / Romance


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 202 times
October 15, 2016 at 03:51 PM



Erin Moriarty as Claire
Kathryn Hahn as Harper
Missi Pyle as Ellen
720p 1080p
876.63 MB
23.976 fps
1hr 58 min
P/S 541 / 2,716
1.82 GB
23.976 fps
1hr 58 min
P/S 409 / 2,063

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Christina Delimitrou 10 / 10

A gem hidden in the forests of the Pacific Northwest

I watched this in Sundance earlier in the year, and was captivated by the storytelling, acting and cinematography.

The story follows Ben (Viggo Mortensen), a father of six, living deep in the forests of the pacific northwest, far from modern life. All six children, from seventeen year old Bodevan to seven year old Nai are fluent in philosophy, history and quantum theory (!), and can hunt and fend for themselves in the wilderness. At least that is until the suicide of their mother forces the family to clash with modern society, and then Ben realizes that he has in fact not prepared his children at all for what lies outside their forest. Bodevan, for example, accepted in a swarm of the top colleges and adept enough to kill a deer single-handedly, cannot bring himself to talk to a girl without immediately proposing to her.

The family's ideals further come under stress when his late wife's father (Frank Langella) who hates the life Ben has created for his family comes into the picture, and forbids Ben from attending his wife's funeral, threatening him with arrest. In what could have easily turned into a one-dimensional harsh/rich character, Frank Langella also projects empathy and deep grief over his daughter's death. When Ben and his children visit his sister's much more conventional family, and her smart phone-obsessed children, Ben criticizes their upbringing, only to have his sister bring his own parenting skills into question. Director Matt Ross skillfully presents both sides here without picking favorites.

Acting-wise the film is captivating, with Mortensen fitting the renaissance profile of Ben like a glove. He projects all the arrogance and hardheadedness of Ben together with his warmth, adoration for his children, and respect for his wife's wishes with grace and subtlety in one of the most seemingly effortless performances I have seen. He is also surrounded by an excellent supporting cast, from the children to his in-laws and sister.

In summary, Captain Fantastic is a rare case where family dynamics, with their controversies and dilemmas are not oversimplified to a preaching doctrine in the finale; the film allows the viewer the space to find their own balance on what it means to raise a child.

Reviewed by David Ferguson ([email protected]) 8 / 10

a clash of philosophies

Greetings again from the darkness. There seems to be no end to the theories on how to be an effective parent and raise kids who are productive, well-adjusted and successful. Writer/director Matt Ross offers up a creative, entertaining and thought-provoking story of one family's unconventional approach in a world that seems to expect and accept only the conventional.

We are first introduced to Ben (Viggo Mortensen) and his six kids as they are stalking a deer while deep in the Pacific Northwest forest … only this isn't your buddy's weekend deer hunting trip. Each family member is covered head-to-toe in mud and other means of camouflage, and the oldest son Bodevan (George MacKay) takes the lead with his knife in what is presented as a rite of passage into manhood.

The family carries out a daily ritual that includes extreme physical conditioning, lessons on survival and living off the land, and advanced education that includes reading such diverse material as Dostoevsky and Lolita. Each evening is capped off with an impromptu musical jam. It's evident that self-sufficiency, intelligence and family loyalty are crucial to Ben's approach … an approach that is challenged when circumstances require the family board their Partridge Family bus (named Steve) and take a cross-country road trip into a civilization that doesn't know what to make of them (and vice-versa).

The film is jam-packed with social commentary on education, parenting, societal norms, societal influences, and even grief. Who gets to decide what is best for a family or what's the best method for education? Sometimes the dysfunctional family isn't so easy to identify. Director Ross proves this in a gem of a dinner table scene as Ben and the kids visit Kathryn Hahn, Steve Zahn and their two sons in suburbia.

In addition to the terrific performance by up-and-comer George MacKay, the other actors playing the kids are all very strong and believable: Samantha Isler as Kieyler, Annalise Basso as Vespyr, Nicholas Hamilton as Rellian, Shree Crooks as Zaja, and Charlie Shotwell as Nai. Screen vets Frank Langella and Ann Dowd bring presence to the role of their grandparents and provide the greatest contrast to the off-the-grid existence of the kids.

Viggo Mortensen truly shines here and gives a performance full of grace and depth as he displays many emotions (some of which aren't so pleasant). He even goes full-Viggo for one of the film's many humorous moments … though the comedy is balanced by plenty of full scale drama. His best work comes in the scenes when he begins to question that there may be some flaws in his plan … the moments of self-realization are stunning.

Many will note some similarities between this film and Little Miss Sunshine (2006), though this one carries quite a bit more heft. It's beautifully photographed by cinematographer Stephane Fontaine (A Prophet, Rust and Bone) and captures the danger and solitude of the forest, while also capturing the more personal family dynamics. It's a film that should generate plenty of discussion, and one of the questions is … will Noam Chomsky Day ever match Festivus in popularity?

Reviewed by David De Souza 10 / 10

"Power to the people! Stick it to the man!"

Is it worth the price of a movie ticket? Yes!

I felt that this film was captivating in all aspects of story-telling. Especially in it's acting where all characters in the film did a superb job with special mention to Viggo Mortensen (Ben - Father) and George Mackay (Bo - Eldest Son). This film depicts the difficulty of parenting at the highest level as Ben has to raise his 6 children in the wilderness alone in the way he thinks will be best for them. Bo shows the rational side of this story as he accepts who he is, how he was raised, and who he wants to become in the future. We clearly see the struggle of a young man who will take care of his siblings yet long for a life he has never known. This was my first time seeing George MacKay on the big screen with a big part and he certainly did not disappoint. His performance along with Viggo Mortensen was the perfect balance for the film.

The realness and rawness of this film aligns perfectly with Ben's choice in parenting and survival instincts in the wilderness. We are easily immersed into the idea that civilization and it's systems of government are toxic and that we as a people who take part in it are living the wrong life. A film that can manipulate at such a high degree is a great example of a film with a genius plot.

The cinematography was beautiful as to be expected. Our setting for most of the film is in the Pacific Northwest and it was a pleasure to see that they didn't saturate the screen with wide aerial shots of the forest and mountains throughout the film. Instead they focused more on the home within the mountains. Details highlighting living spaces indoors and outdoors was a beautiful contrast to the another setting later in the film. Kielyr "This house is a vulgar display of wealth" Vespy "and an unethical use of space!". I believe the cinematographer & director chose not to concentrate on details of the luxurious house as they did with the home in the forest. Mostly shot on wides to display its enormity and that was all that was needed.

The soundtrack I felt fit perfectly with the film. Times of quiet were also used very well here. The editing was seamless and kept the story moving perfectly.

I take my hat off to Matt Ross for a genius script that focuses on ideas of socialism, the complexities of human relationships, and coming of age story. With his role as director, he was able to execute the overall emotional effect of the viewer with the film's well balanced blend of comedy and pathos.

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