Fences

2016

Drama

132
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 93%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 79%
IMDb Rating 7.3 10 39175

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
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March 04, 2017 at 09:03 PM

Cast

Denzel Washington as Troy Maxson
Viola Davis as Rose Maxson
720p 1080p
1003.16 MB
1280*720
English
PG-13
23.976 fps
2hr 19 min
P/S 316 / 1,803
2.09 GB
1920*1080
English
PG-13
23.976 fps
2hr 19 min
P/S 439 / 1,799

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by themoviemix 9 / 10

Fences Is 2016's Most Well-Acted Film

"Some people build fences to keep people out, and other people build fences to keep people in."

The first thing movie-goers should understand about Fences is that it is very much a filmed play. An adaption of August Wilson's Tony- winning play, director Denzel Washington has kept the project as minimalist as possible. There's good reason for this. Wilson's words are exciting enough that there is just no need for big action, large sets nor grandiose cinematography. Fences is a small, intimate story about Troy Maxson (Denzel Washington) and his close-knit circle of family and friends. This small cast of characters is used to speak volumes about how far the Black community had come in overcoming prejudices by the 50s-era the story takes place in, but how far they still had to go. It talks about the roles of husbands, wives and children; the sacrifices we all make to support each other, often giving up our own dreams but never losing sight of them.

Much has been said of the performances here, and with good reason. They're terrific. Viola Davis will get her Oscar this year, there's little doubt in my mind. Her Rose Maxson is so reserved and subtle for much of the film, allowing Troy's continual imperfections and abuses to store inside her and chip away at her emotionally until the final straw causes her to erupt near the final act of the movie. It's an emotional and painful performance to observe, and one many, particularly long-time wives and mothers, will find easy to relate to but at times difficult to watch.

As for Washington, I find it difficult to understand why he isn't the front-runner for Best Actor this year. I've seen front-runner Casey Affleck's performance in Manchester By The Sea and it is excellent and look forward to Ryan Gosling's turn in La La Land; but what Washington does in Fences is special. Simpy put, it's one of the best performances I've ever seen an actor give. Troy is a very imperfect man to say the least. He's not necessarily a "bad guy", in fact most men will be able to see a little of themselves in Troy. He's a likable personality who does some despicable things. HIs tough love approach to raising his son seems more out of spite than love. And while there can be no doubt that he loves Rose, his behavior proves that love and respect are not the same thing. Washington crawls into this raw and complex character, becoming Troy to the extent that no matter how big a star Washington is, you forget you're watching an actor.

The supporting cast fairs well, particularly Stephen Henderson as Troy's friend and work-mate Bono, Jovan Adepo as his son Cory and Mykelti Williamson as his mentally-challenged brother Gabriel. Everyone seems to be working their hardest to do Wilson's words justice, and their efforts result it what may be the most overall well-acted film of the year.

Fences won't appeal to everyone. Those looking for action and extravaganza, this is not your movie. But if you're like me and enjoy watching good actors perform a well-written script, then you'll be enthralled by every minute of Fences.

Reviewed by nama chakravorty 5 / 10

Fabulous Performances Shine in an Overlong Film!

Based on the Pulitzer Prize winning play of the same name by The Late/Great August Wilson, 'Fences' is a film that boasts Fabulous Performances from its terrific cast that Shine undeniably, but the film, as a whole, is overlong! Also, the narrative gets repetitive after a point.

'Fences' Synopsis: A working-class African-American father tries to raise his family in the 1950s, while coming to terms with the events of his life.

Denzel Washington directs 'Fences' with a realistic feeling & the film legend is absolutely terrific in the central role. As Troy Maxson, the protagonist, Denzel is firebrand, delivering a performance full of feeling & frustration. But the film belongs to Viola Davis, who steals the show. Davis, an absolute acting pioneer, is priceless as the wife, offering a portrayal of loyalty, motherhood & heartbreak. Davis is sure to win Awards ahead (Already Having Won The Golden-Globe recently), yes Academy, I'm talking to you! In supporting roles, Stephen McKinley Henderson, Jovan Adepo, Russell Hornsby, Saniyya Sidney & Mykelti Williamson lend remarkable support.

Now coming to the minuses! The Screenplay works in parts. Considering its been adapted from a play, the writing sticks to its true roots a bit too much. The locations remain the same & the literal translation becomes monotonous after a point. Troy's bitter attitude towards his Sons & his Wife's sacrifices, don't engross you beyond a point. The Writing needed to be crisper. And the film is overlong! At a 139-minutes, 'Fences' overstays its welcome by at least 20-minutes. I wish the narrative was stronger, as it begins beautifully.

So what's the final word? 'Fences' is greatly acted, but as a film, it's a disappointment!

Reviewed by David Ferguson ([email protected]) 8 / 10

Swinging for the fences

Greetings again from the darkness. Just about any use of words you can think of serves some part in this screen adaptation of renowned playwright August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize and multiple Tony award winning stage production. It first hit Broadway in 1987 with James Earl Jones and Mary Alice in the leads, and the 2010 revival starred Denzel Washington and Viola Davis – both who reprise their roles for the movie version. It's also the third directorial feature from Mr. Washington (The Great Debaters, Antwone Fisher).

The story takes place in mid-1950's Pittsburgh and is a family drama character study centered on patriarch Troy Maxson (Washington), a former Negro League star and ex-con, who now works days on a garbage truck before coming home to his wife Rose of 18 years (Ms. Davis) and their son Cory (Jovan Adepo, "The Leftovers"). The Friday night after work ritual finds Troy holding court in his backyard with his best friend and co-worker Bono (Stephen Henderson), as they share a bottle of gin and pontificate on the injustices that have landed them in this place and time.

Another regular Friday occurrence is the drop-in of Troy's son by his first wife. Lyons (Russell Hornsby) is a musician who shows up on payday for a "loan" from dad. To say there is tension between the two would be an understatement, and it's the complex relationships between Troy and everyone else that is the crux of the story. Another player here is Troy's brother Gabriel (Mykelti Williamson), who periodically wanders by talking about battling demons and hellhounds. See, Gabriel suffered a severe head injury during WWII and now has a plate in his head but no real place in society.

Troy is a proud and bitter man, unwilling to acknowledge that the world is changing. Instead he holds firm to his belief that the white man will always hold back the man of color. It happened to him in baseball (though actually he was too old by the time Jackie Robinson joined the Dodgers) and he refuses to believe Cory can succeed in football despite his being recruited by a college. Troy jumps between charming and caustic, and his fast-talking bellowing style can be entertaining, enlightening, condescending and intimidating … sometimes all of the above within a few sentences.

There is magic in the words of Austin Wilson, and as a film, this is a true acting clinic. The performances keep us glued to the screen in each scene. Denzel is a dominating presence, and the single best moment belongs to the terrific Viola Davis. Her explosive release conveys the agony-of-the-years, the broken dreams, and the crushing blow of broken trust. As a viewer, we aren't sure whether to stand and applaud her or comfort her with a warm hug. The only possible criticism might be that the stage roots are obvious in the film version. The theatrical feel comes courtesy of the sets which are minimal and basic with no visual wow factor. But this minor drawback only serves to emphasize the characters and their interactions.

It's pointed out to us (and Troy) that fences can be used to keep things out or keep things in. During his pontificating, Troy uses a couple of phrases more than once: "Living with a full count", and "Take the crooked with the straight". He often waxes philosophical, and it's through these words that we realize both he and Rose took their sense of duty and responsibility so seriously that they both lost their selves in the process. Making do with one's situation should not mean the end of dreams and hopes, and it certainly gives no one the right to hold back anyone from pursuing the path they choose. While watching the actors, don't miss the message.

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