Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed

1969

Drama / Horror / Sci-Fi

10
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 50%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 69%
IMDb Rating 6.9 10 3158

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
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December 06, 2016 at 04:00 AM

Director

Cast

Peter Cushing as Baron Frankenstein
Freddie Jones as Professor Richter
Simon Ward as Karl
720p 1080p
722.55 MB
1280*720
English
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 38 min
P/S 0 / 9
1.51 GB
1920*1080
English
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 38 min
P/S 3 / 12

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by vampyr-5 10 / 10

"Hammer's fifth Frankenstein presents the Baron as a totally irredeemable character."

Hammer Films' 5th Frankenstein film is their best. Cushing brings a new pathos to the character of the Baron that is consistent with, and at the same time, different than his previous films. Terence Fisher brings an unbelievable sense of style to this, his best film. The ending is unbelievably good. However, if new to Hammer - I don't suggest you start with this one. Ideally, view the Frankenstein films in order (Curse of Frankenstein, Revenge of Frankenstein, (feel free to skip) Evil of Frankenstein and Frankenstein Created Woman. This film will be far stronger as a result. Disturbed till the end!

Reviewed by The_Void 9 / 10

Hammer's 5th Frankenstein film is proof positive of the fine work of Cushing/Fisher.

Frankenstein must be Destroyed is one of the best of the hammer horror series; and that is saying something, as the studio has produced a lot of horror highlights. Peter Cushing stars as Baron Frankenstein, the mad doctor whom everyone and their dog will recognise instantly from the classic novel. This film is an interesting variation on the classic story, and it sees Baron Frankenstein involving himself in the practice of brain transplant surgery. The film doesn't have anything to do with the classic novel; it doesn't make reference to it at any time, and it's only notable similarity to that from which it is based is the character of Baron Frankenstein. Saying that; it doesn't really matter, as this film stands on it's own from the original story.

The character of Frankenstein has been changed a lot from the one that we all know and love. The original Frankenstein was an over-ambitious scientist that got in over his head and later found redemption. The one here, however, is pure evil. He has no remorse for any of what he has done, and he treats murder only as an obstacle that is in his way. He is cold, calculating and overall; not a nice man. The story really takes off when Frankenstein blackmails Karl, a young scientist, into helping him perform the first brain transplant. The two kidnap Dr Brandt, a fellow mad-scientist who has gone insane and is being held in a mental asylum. A lot of the film's horror is drawn from the character of Frankenstein, who is expertly portrayed by Peter Cushing.

Peter Cushing is a great actor, and is more than up there on the illustrious list of horror legends. He's not as pronounced as fellow legend Vincent Price, or as malevolent as fellow legend Christopher Lee; but Peter Cushing has a niche all of his own. His persona is extremely creepy, especially in this film. He's not evil like you would imagine evil to be; he has a much more intelligent, more calculating presence; and that is far more scary than any man in a monster suit. Peter Cushing's screen presence is in his authority; he isn't a big and strong man, but he's not the sort of person that you would want to upset because you just KNOW that something bad will happen to anyone who does. The acting in Frankenstein Must be Destroyed is surprisingly good, actually; from Hammer films, you don't tend to expect great acting, but this one delivers. Simon Ward stars (almost!) opposite Peter Cushing as the young scientist blackmailed by Frankenstein. He's definitely second fiddle to the awesome Peter Cushing, but he performs admirably. Freddie Jones is the real star besides Cushing; although no Boris Karloff, his performance as the man turned into a monster is perfectly tragic. Veronica Carlson is the lady of the film, and she does just fine; and some credit must go to Thorley Walters, too; the man that plays the hazardously idiotic police inspector.

The ending of the movie is great, and draws parallels with that of the original novel, in that it's exciting, flame-ridden and everyone gets their comeuppance. Credit must go to Terrence Fisher; he has directed a number of Frankenstein (and Dracula) films, and following up on a classic novel and doing it well is no easy feat. Frankenstein Must be Destroyed is a horror highlight, and a must for fans of the genre.

Reviewed by TheLittleSongbird 8 / 10

One of the best of the Hammer Frankenstein films

For me the only two that are superior are Curse of Frankenstein and Revenge of Frankenstein(with the weakest being The Evil of Frankenstein). Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed is Peter Cushing's penultimate outing as Frankenstein and it's a very strong one.

I do have to agree with those saying that the rape scene wasn't all that necessary- it is clear that Frankenstein is depraved but the film did go a bit too far adding that in- and did seem in bad taste. The climax is very exciting and suspenseful but ends a little too hastily, and parts of the second half are a little padded. Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed as with most Hammer horrors is visually accomplished, love the sumptuous Gothic quality of the costume and set design, it's a very colourful film to look at and the film is photographed beautifully and atmospherically. Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed is hauntingly scored, with the music really complimenting the atmosphere well and even enhances it while also not over-powering.

The script is witty, nuanced and tense with no signs of irrelevant froth or juvenile misplaced humour, while the story has never a dull moment(even with the odd bit of padding in the second half and is always compelling, giving off a really suspenseful, creepy and occasionally violent atmosphere. Two scenes really stood out, the buried body bursting out of the earth is unsettlingly scary and there is a scene between Freddie Jones's character and his wife that genuinely brought tears to the eye. Terence Fisher's direction is taut and unflinching. The acting is very fine all round, with top honours going to a chillingly incisive Peter Cushing as a more evil Frankenstein this time round, an alluring and heartfelt Veronica Carlson(the gowns she wears here suited her) and especially a hauntingly powerful Freddie Jones. All in all, a very strong penultimate Hammer Frankenstein outing for Cushing and the third best of the series after Curse and Revenge. 8/10 Bethany Cox

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