Gifted

2017

Drama

409
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 69%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 86%
IMDb Rating 7.7 10 42252

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 969,196 times
July 11, 2017 at 06:00 AM

Director

Cast

Chris Evans as Frank Adler
Jenny Slate as Bonnie Stevenson
Elizabeth Marvel as Gloria Davis
Octavia Spencer as Roberta Taylor
720p 1080p
741.24 MB
1280*720
English
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 41 min
P/S 167 / 2,135
1.54 GB
1920*1080
English
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 41 min
P/S 137 / 1,429

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by rannynm 8 / 10

Powerful Statement, Outstanding Acting, Stunning Cinematography

Gifted is a story with not a lot of surprise elements, but it wins the audience over with its powerful statement, outstanding acting and stunning cinematography. Mainly, Gifted has a very dramatic story line. However, Gifted offers much more then that. Viewers also get a subplot of romance, friendship and strong family values as well as some comedy here and there to keep a dramatic movie light.

The plot begins when Mary Adler (Mckenna Grace) starts first grade. She isn't like the other kids in her class. Her teacher, Bonnie (Jenny Slate) soon learns that Mary turns out to be a genius in mathematics. She can easily do equations higher than high school level. Despite her clear giftedness, Mary's uncle, Frank (Chris Evans) refuses to put Maryin a school for gifted children, trying to keep the girl's life normal. Evelyn (Lindsay Duncan), Mary's grandmother insists on making her do mathematics around the clock and training her to be a math prodigy. What follows is a custody battle between the two for Mary.

My favorite scene really stands out due to remarkable lighting and camera work. The scene really doesn't contribute to the plot, but the cinematography makes it one of the most excellent in the film. The scene shows Mary riding on Frank's shoulders. Behind them, a giant sunset completely fills the sky. The lighting from the setting sun comes out stunningly dazzling. Even though it doesn't add to the complexity of the story, the scene is very impressive and demonstrates the closeness of the uncle and his niece.

One of Gifted's weak points waters down to the story. Even though the film is unique from other stories about genius kids, by focusing on the family values and relationships instead of Mary's exceptional mathematical skills, it still comes out very predictable and rather simple. The main conflict never really feels like a major issue but rather, just a side story. Despite those issues, Gifted still entertains through the acting. All the actors deliver outstanding performances. Mckenna Grace, despite being only 10-years-old, completely steals the show. Never does the acting feel forced and the actors seem to authentically connect with their characters and have a true bond on-screen.

There are a few adult references in the film, but nothing too worry about. I recommend this for ages 8 to 18 and give it 4 out of 5 stars because, although the story needs work, the acting and cinematography make Gifted a very entertaining and memorable film.

By Gerry O., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic. For more reviews by youth, visit kidsfirst dot org.

Reviewed by David Ferguson ([email protected]) 7 / 10

how do we choose who chooses?

Greetings again from the darkness. The "right" choice isn't always obvious. Things get more complicated when even the "best" choice isn't clear. Place a young child at the heart of that decision tree, and the result may yield emotional turmoil and an abundance of moral high ground and judgment. Such best intentions are at the core of this latest from director Marc Webb (his first feature since 500 Days of Summer) and writer Tom Flynn.

Frank (Chris Evans) is raising his 10 year old child prodigy niece Mary (Mckenna Grace) in low-key small town Florida. The circumstances that brought the two of them together aren't initially known, but are explained in a poignant moment later in the film. Frank has been home-schooling Mary and now believes it's time she transitions to public school for the socialization aspect … "try being a kid for once" he urges. Of course, Mary's teacher Bonnie (Jenny Slate, Obvious Child) immediately realizes Mary is special, and just like that, the wheels of the educational system are in motion to explain to Frank why they know what's best for Mary … a high-fallutin private school where she can be all she can be.

There is a really nice and enjoyable story here of Uncle Frank dedicated to doing what he thinks is best for bright and charming and spirited young Mary, but it all comes crashing down when the bureaucrats, and ultimately Frank's mother (Lindsay Duncan), get involved. When the adults can't agree on the best route for Mary, a courtroom battle ensues. Ms. Duncan gets a witness scene reminiscent of Jack Nicholson in A Few Good Men, and her overall performance stands in effective stark contrast to the warm fuzzies of Mr. Evans.

The supporting cast contributes nicely, though Octavia Spencer's role as kindly neighbor Roberta is more limited than it should be, and the love connection between Evans and Ms. Slate could have easily been omitted - but she is so pleasant on screen, that we don't mind at all. Glenn Plummer and John Finn are the attorneys who go to war, and Fred the one-eyed cat also gets plenty of screen time. But there is little doubt that the movie really belongs to the effervescent Miss Grace. She nails the back and forth between kid and genius, and we never doubt her sincerity.

Child prodigies have been explored through other fine movies such as Little Man Tate, Searching for Bobby Fisher, and Shine, and while this one may run a bit heavier on melodrama, but it's worthy of that group. The best discussions after this movie would revolve around what's best for the child. Should she be deprived of "higher" education in order to live within a more "normal" social environment? Are any of the adults more interested in their own ego than in what's in the child's best interest? Home school vs public school vs private school is always good for some fireworks, and everyone has their own thoughts. So how do we decide who gets to decide? Does a parent get the final say on their child – even if their motivations may be in doubt? Should every kid be pushed to their academic – or artistic – or athletic – limits? The questions are many and the answers are complicated. There is a great line in the film that itself is worthy of conversation: "You got on the bad side of a small-minded person with authority". Yikes. Even Cat Stevens' great song "The Wind" can't soften that.

Reviewed by rioplaydrum 9 / 10

Charming And Gripping

I knew nothing about this film. Had seen no adds, heard no word of mouth, pretty much nothing.

I only found it only after tapping out the local AMC 24 and driving a few extra miles to see something new.

The premise was intriguing: What to do with a seven year old mathematical prodigy caught between a cozy, loving household occupied by her doting Uncle Frank and a one-eyed cat named Fred, and a challenging but cold academic world ready to pace her on mental treadmills for the rest of her life.

McKenna Grace plays little Mary who's character is at the center of attention whether she likes it or not. Mostly not.

Grace's performance does raise a few eye brows as she very convincingly plays a precocious and genius little girl plagued with boredom being surrounded by the dead-weight of average students she has nothing in common with.

In fact, Mary's personality is also far developed beyond her peers, exhibiting a sarcastic and jaded sense of humor more on par with a bunch of 40-year olds downing a shot or two after a particularly bad day at work.

After Mary's abilities are discovered by her first grade teacher, the inevitable battle for command of her future quickly unfolds.

One very powerful supporting role is supplied by Lindsay Duncan who portrays Evelyn the Grandmother. Evelyn is a poised and proper Englishwoman armed with a titanium intellect few would want to challenge. As the legal proceedings unfold, Evelyn verbally fire-bombs the entire court room from the stand without batting an eye in her fight for custody of Mary.

Her arguments and assessments are hopelessly air-tight and seamless, leaving Uncle Frank and his lawyer scrambling.

Frank just wants Mary to be a little girl. Grandma wants to plug her into The Matrix. Who will win?

'Gifted' is not without it's displays of some original laughs. My favorite was a scene in which little Mary discovers her Uncle Frank is sleeping with her 1st grade teacher, who one morning comes stumbling into the kitchen wearing only a towel.

Their reaction to each other is priceless.

As to why this production is flying under the radar with virtually no advertising or promotion is baffling.

The hour-and-a-half flew by for me and left me with an odd feeling it ended too soon. Aside from that, there was almost nothing wrong with this film, at least not that I could find.

Warm, unique and entertaining, 'Gifted' should stay with you for days afterwards.

A great family night movie.

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