Last Cab to Darwin


Action / Comedy / Drama / Romance


Uploaded By: LINUS
Downloaded 95,691 times
January 23, 2016 at 04:28 PM



Jacki Weaver as Dr. Farmer
Emma Hamilton as Julie
John Howard as Simmo
David Field as Dougie
720p 1080p
906.08 MB
24 fps
2hr 3 min
P/S 10 / 33
1.87 GB
24 fps
2hr 3 min
P/S 1 / 36

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Matt Johnson 8 / 10

Nearness to Death is Opportunity to Reassess Life

"Drink your beer and shut up" is the essence of male culture in Australia. "Mateship" is the term for it. Rex, a 70 year old cab driver from Broken Hill in New South Wales, finds – as he must have already felt for a long time - that mateship is a double edged sword. He is diagnosed with terminal stomach cancer and can't bring himself to tell his friends or the woman he secretly loves. "There's no one else," he tells his doctor. Instead he drives his cab 2,000 plus miles across the Australian outback to Darwin where there is a newly opened and experimental euthanasia clinic. "Why," asks the woman who might have been his wife "did you not tell me?!" "You never asked," answers Rex, matter-of-factly. Rex has never seen the sea, among other things, and his eyes are opened to new scenery and people. His nearness to death is an opportunity to reassess his life and, like Odysseus, for adventure.

While much of the film is drama and serious in nature, it is also light-hearted. A mechanic tells Rex to keep his fluids up while driving in the desert, and Rex promptly goes into the bar for beer. One theme is the plight of Australia's aborigines. Whites took away much of their culture and stories, and as a result, who they are. The acting is really wonderful, especially the lead who is a veteran of Australian films and television and well-loved for such roles for his entire life. I love the ornate and wonderful arts and crafts homes as well as the scenery of Australia. The film is loosely based on a true story. The only real drawbacks are that it is somewhat predictable and short. Seen at the Toronto International Film Festival 2015.

Reviewed by david-rector-85092 8 / 10

A road movie with loads of heart and spirit. Another great Australian film

Michael Caton has been a fixture on Australian screens since the 1970's thanks to TV shows like 'The Sullivans' and 'Packed to the Rafters'. His voice is quintessentially Aussie and his face and personality have made him a household name. His casting for this film is perfect and I can't even imagine another actor as Rex; so perfect is Caton, and such a gift for an actor who has mostly been the family uncle or grandad. Here he is, front and centre; stoic, three dimensional and instantly likable. Director Jeremy Sims, himself a TV and film actor, has elicited an award worthy performance from the veteran, but also helps young actor Mark Coles Smith as Tilly, make one of the year's best supporting turns. The camera just loves his wicked grin and his playful, easy charm. The film pulls no punches with some of the content surrounding both the indigenous characters such as Tilly, or the circumstances and realities of euthanasia. I was disappointed with Jacki Weaver here: she never looks or sounds comfortable with her character, and that is unfortunate as it is a linchpin to the film's trajectory, but Caton's 'Rex' is so unforgettable, that he carries even the weaker elements of the movie. Beautifully photographed and capturing the visceral parts of the landscape and the terrain, 'Last Cab To Darwin' is not a perfect film, but an enjoyable and significant one, and a rewarding one for its leading actor.

Reviewed by fordmodelt Ford 9 / 10

Best Australian movie in years

What a terrific film on all levels. It's been released for a few weeks now, but drew a reasonable sized crowd on a Sunday night on the back of strong press reviews. I think it's going to continue to pull in crowds on the strength of word of mouth recommendations. Including mine.

Generally I'm not a fan of Australian films but this one is great. Starting with the cast. Michael Caton was excellent and had surprising depths in his performance that I never expected him to have. The only weak link in the cast is Jackie Weaver, despite having "Academy Award Nominee" forever attached to her name now. Even though many of the support cast were not well known actors, only Weaver's acting was poor. She looked like "I'm acting this" with nearly every line she delivered. The young guy who played Tilly was fantastic - and surprisingly convincing in his one emotionally vulnerable scene.

Secondly, the script. I heard one radio reviewer say that the dialogue by 'blackfellas' in movies is usually very obviously written by white writers, and rarely rings 'true'. Similarly, writers who want to shoehorn Australian colloquialisms into a movie or stage play often do it in a very clumsy way. But in Last Cab to Darwin, the dialogue does ring true and the writers are to be congratulated.

Next, the themes. This is not a 90 minute 'quickie' of a movie. It has real depth, not just on the issue of euthanasia, but also on black/white prejudices in country Australia, and the movie doesn't skirt around indigenous social problems either.

Then there's the scenery. Spectacular. And I bet the places featured along Rex's road trip enjoy an upturn in visitor numbers in the next year or so as a result of this film.

Finally there's the humour. It is quintessentially Australian dry humour and it's quick and subtle and sprinkled throughout. The best line is the one about the dog's name. Still making me chuckle even now - as much as anything because you didn't see it coming at the time and Michael Caton's delivery was perfect.

As Molly Meldrum would say: do yourself a favour and go and see it.

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