Logan

2017

Action / Drama / Sci-Fi / Thriller

991
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 92%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 92%
IMDb Rating 8.2 10 404466

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 2,580,146 times
May 22, 2017 at 06:55 AM

Director

Cast

Hugh Jackman as Logan
Stephen Merchant as Caliban
Boyd Holbrook as Pierce
Patrick Stewart as Charles
720p 1080p
1014.33 MB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
2hr 17 min
P/S 191 / 1,159
2.09 GB
1920*1080
English
R
23.976 fps
2hr 17 min
P/S 179 / 1,521

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by shawneofthedead 9 / 10

A fine, fitting farewell to an iconic character, LOGAN is one of the best superhero movies ever made.

Let's cut to the chase, shall we? In every beat, every frame, every moment, LOGAN feels like the Wolverine movie Hugh Jackman has been waiting (and training) for 17 years to make. Set free of a PG rating, this wildly kinetic film has plenty of gore, action and violence pumping through its veins. But what makes this one of the finest superhero movies ever produced is the big, messy, somewhat broken heart beating at its core.

Set in a grim near-future where very few mutants remain alive, we meet an unthinkable incarnation of our favourite enclawed superhero: one who's decidedly past his prime. This is not the near-immortal Wolverine we remember, but Logan (Jackman): a broken, far older man who feels the weight of every wound inflicted upon him. His once- formidable body – tattooed with scars that aren't healing as fast or as well as they used to – seems to be failing. It's only his determination to keep the ailing, ageing Professor Charles Xavier (Stewart) safe and alive that never falters.

The film's plot kicks into overdrive when Logan's fate becomes entangled with that of Laura (Keen), a close-to-feral young girl who brandishes claws and fury as fierce and lethal as Logan's own. As the unlikely trio go on the run, we see echoes of Logan himself in Laura's terrifying rage and the tentative emotional connection she forges with Xavier. It's one of many smart moves on the part of James Mangold, who does double duty as director and co-writer. Bringing Laura into the picture allows him to explore Logan's trauma, regret and hope through the filter of this pint-sized powerhouse's origin story.

In effect, Mangold has placed an intimate family drama squarely at the heart of this ostensible blockbuster film – strip the characters of their superpowers and LOGAN would still pulse with plenty of heartbreak and humanity. Logan keeps dragging himself through the world when one suspects all he wants to do is die. Xavier grapples with his own frailty as his once-sharp mind deteriorates and betrays him, again and again. Laura is a tough, tender mess of contradictions: a victim of horrific abuse but also a warrior in the making. Watching them interact – fighting, screaming, arguing, glaring and, once in a while, forgiving – will elicit laughter and tears (lots of tears), in a way that no other superhero film to date has quire managed.

That doesn't mean, however, that LOGAN is an entirely joyless, sombre affair. Far from it. It proves, quite conclusively, that films in this genre can plumb the darkest of psychological depths while finding welcome ways to leaven the misery. (Note: this is something Zack Snyder would do well to learn as he continues to expand DC's largely mirthless cinematic universe.) Mangold threads moments of genuine humour into the proceedings – from casual shoplifting and runaway horses, to an ornery old man who refuses to take his pills.

The fast and furious action beats in LOGAN are also quite delightful to witness. The violence that's on full, bloody display is dark and horrible, but somehow fitting for this film in which there really are consequences for battles fought and lost. It's only when you see Logan's claws plunging into flesh, shearing cleanly through meat and bone, that you realise just how neutered and family-friendly his earlier outings were. There's a slow-motion sequence halfway through the film, as Logan struggles to get to an embattled Xavier, that's gritty and beautiful to watch – as thrilling as that scene-stealing Quicksilver moment in X-Men: Days Of Future Past. And it goes without saying that watching Laura gracefully spin and slice her way through oncoming attackers manages to be terribly wrong and wonderfully right at the same time.

To be quite frank, none of this would work without the incredible cast, all of them doing award-worthy work that will, sadly, be overlooked because their characters have such silly things as 'powers'. It's truly unsettling to watch Stewart dig beneath his natural gravitas to find the shaken core of a Professor X who's semi-consciously losing grip of his mind – the best and most dangerous mind in the universe. Keen is a revelation. Grabbing this breakout role by the throat and making it very much her own, she somehow manages to convey Laura's childish fragility and overpowering strength, often in the same breath.

And, finally, there's Jackman. He's been training for and playing the role that catapulted him to global stardom for 17 years now, and he brings everything he has to this final outing as Logan. He nails Logan's physical tics, of course: from his grizzled and aged demeanour, to his rattling cough and copious drinking. But Jackman also takes delight in unearthing the dark sadness at the heart of this once invincible, now vulnerable man. There is a hope and purity in Logan that doesn't always show through his wisecracks, but it shines brightly and unexpectedly here – often in the film's saddest moments.

There are a handful of things about the film don't work quite so well. The main antagonists, played by Richard E. Grant and Boyd Holbrook, are largely forgettable – there's not much that defines them outside their nefarious goals. As many viewers may be turned off by Logan's relentless misery and eye-popping violence as those who welcome it.

But this doesn't detract from the fact that LOGAN is a remarkable achievement. It manages to be several things at once: a bruising action film, a tender family drama and an intimate character study, liberally shaken through with comic-book sensibilities and a Western or two. If Jackman really is hanging up his claws for good, there could be no better way to bid farewell to one of Marvel's most enduring and appealing characters.

Reviewed by trublu215 10 / 10

If there was ever a comic book movie deemed worthy of perfect, Logan is it.

The word 'perfect' is very objective especially when it comes to film. While Logan may not be a perfect film, it is most certainly a perfect comic book film. It is a masterpiece of the most epic proportions and leaves us with a brilliant swan song for producer and star Hugh Jackman in his final outing as Wolverine. The film, directed brilliantly by James Mangold, is a two plus hour comic book fan's wet dream as we see the version of Wolverine every fan has wanted to see for nearly two decades. While many will be very sad to see Jackman step down from the role, he couldn't have picked a better or more satisfying film to end his cinematic legacy with.

The film takes place in 2029 and shows the world in shambles. Mutants are nearly extinct, water is scarce and the world is just an overall wasteland. This is where we find Logan. He is a limo driving cantankerous caretaker to an even more cantankerous Professor X, who is now suffering from dementia and seizures. He is a borderline alcoholic suffering from a mysterious illness that limits his mutant abilities. Due to this, he lives this quiet life until he meets a young girl who he feels he must protect. Without giving too much away, there is much more here than I can go into but I will say, if you are a fan of the Wolverine comics, this film will bring a tear to your eye. This is probably the most faithful adaptation of a comic book character EVER, Marvel and DC combined. The way the story goes, the way Logan behaves, the selflessness and the rage, this is an all around realized version of this character. While it may have taken a little longer than it should have, this film was worth the wait. James Mangold does a fantastic job at creating the world Logan knows now. This is more of a film like Mangold's 3:10 to Yuma. It is bleak, violent and absolutely heartbreaking. This is far from the PG-13 character we're used to. This is a foul mouthed, miserable and very VERY bloody rendition of the source material. This is a film very much like The Guantlet or Badlands, a crime thriller and on-the-road drama. It very much embodies the look and feel of a film from the mid-70s and it plays to this very well.

The performances in this film are amazing. Hugh Jackman's performance here is the best as the character and may be one of the best of his career. He is miserable and broken in this film and to see him like this as the character, it is bittersweet especially because Jackman has been so attached to this role. If he hurts, we hurt. If he's mad, we're mad. It is a true testament to Jackman as an actor to make his audience feel this connected to someone who is, by traditional standards, completely unrelateable. Boyd Holbrook brings a sinister performance to this and continues to build a very impressive resume. Holbrook is someone who you'll love to hate. The real standout performance here is from Dafne Keen who plays Laura. Without giving away any spoilers, she is BADASS in this film and even gives Logan a run for his money on the brutality.

Overall, Logan is a perfect comic book adaptation that is as heartbreaking as it is visually stunning. Mangold and Jackman create a special film with this that should be talked about for years to come. Believe the hype, Logan is a seriously amazing comic book film that just may be the best ever made and embodies the definition of a perfect adaptation.

Reviewed by umashankar pati 10 / 10

No One can ever replace Hugh Jackman as Wolverine. Stellar Performance.

Hugh Jackman's performance. Yeah the dude gave it his all. This is by far Hugh Jackman's best performance as Wolverine. We've never seen Wolverine this vulnerable. He's old, he's broken down, he's beaten. He can't heal like he used to. The conviction from Hugh Jackman in this movie was just spot on and really captured the ways Wolverine felt at certain moments. It added layers to this film. When Wolverine gets into a fight, Hugh Jackman is so good in these scenes it's like he got into a fight with the filmmakers on set.

The writing is solid for a superhero film, it really digs deep into these beloved characters, how vulnerable they are, how they long for a world where people would just leave them be. You truly feel for Xavier and Logan in a way that you never did in the previous X-Men movies, not only because they're now in their twilight years but there's also that father-son type of relationship that's tough love and endearing and then there's also the reluctant father daughter connection Logan has with X-23. By the way, the little girl, Dafne Keen, who plays X-23 is remarkable. So much force, so much energy, so much roar, she's like a cheetah that just runs and slices and dices left and right without prejudice, what an incredible young talent. This is a movie that gives you action to its fullest degree and an emotional journey that's uncompromising. The perfect film about the man who's the best at what he does but what he does isn't very nice.

This film at times gets downright emotional. The final scene of the film makes you wanna cry. You care about these characters, you are invested in them. You don't want to see them put in harm's way. Even in the scenes where the film may feel a bit slow, the final act of the film is the payoff. This is where everything really meshes together with a force, creating a pulse-pounding, edge of your seat final sendoff for Hugh Jackman as he retires from the role. 

This is by far the best Wolverine movie and possibly the best X-Men movie to date. It's up there, and it deserves to be. Everything payed off in this film. It is emotional. It is character driven. It has heart. It is emotional. This is everything anyone could have wanted in a Wolverine film. By the end you will feel like you have reached the end of this long and emotional journey with Logan and it becomes hard to say goodbye. There will be new actors to play Wolverine but I think Hugh Jackman will always be remembered for his portrayal of the character especially with how he brings it full circle in this final chapter. The final scene in this movie was one of the most powerful scenes .

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