Nosferatu the Vampyre


Action / Comedy / Drama / Fantasy / Horror


Uploaded By: OTTO
Downloaded 27,759 times
May 21, 2014 at 10:38 PM



Werner Herzog as Hand and Feet in Box with Rats
Isabelle Adjani as Lucy Harker
Klaus Kinski as Count Dracula
Bruno Ganz as Jonathan Harker
720p 1080p
807.58 MB
24.000 fps
1hr 47 min
P/S 4 / 10
1.64 GB
24.000 fps
1hr 47 min
P/S 6 / 30

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by mstomaso 10 / 10

Atmospheric, creepy and gorgeous

Another classic collaboration of Werner Herzog and Klaus Kinski, Nosferatu is not just a remake of the F. W. Murnau silent classic, but an extension of it. Herzog not only develops the Stoker story more directly than the original did, but even reintroduces the original characters - Orlok becomes Dracula, and the Hutters become the Harkers.

Like many of the films involving Herzog and Kinski, Nosferatu is a period piece and creates the context of its plot through beautiful cinematography and a relentless but unhasty pace, not through the script. ThoughKinski dominates the screen just as he always does in these collaborations, the performances of fellow greats Isabelle Adjani and Bruno Ganz are also worthy of mention. Ganz's Jonathan Harker is certainly the most sympathetic character in the film, and Adjani's Lucy is beautiful, spooky, and just odd enough to fit the role perfectly.

Nosferatu is a retelling of the Dracula tale. Unlike its generally inferior competitors, Nosferatu - both the 1922 and 1979 versions - sticks very close to Bram Stoker's text - neither elaborating the focus on bloodsucking (obsessed upon by most American interpretations of Dracula), nor revising Jonathan Harker and Dr. Van Helsing as heroic characters, nor adding erotic or romantic elements to the depravity of the original concept. If you know what Stoker was about, you will thrill to the often forgotten aspects of Stoker's novel which are redeemed here - the plague rats, the gypsies, etc.

Kinki's intensity allows him to become a perfect Dracula. He understands his role perfectly and never once slips out of 'the hunter'. This is another very important aspect of the Stoker legend which has been sadly contorted by the popularization of the Dracula legend. Nosferatu's Count Dracula is not a charming eastern European gentleman with a quirky bloodsucking habit and a lovesick soul, he is a wily, terrifying, soulless, inhuman, obsessive, predator. And he has absolutely no concern for the affairs of Homo sapiens sapiens.

The film is mostly shot in Amsterdam's old city, which fits the mood of the film well. Other locations are in Germany, and Dracula's castle, for once, is an actual castle - even the interior shots! The wonderfully eerie and disorienting Popul Vuh soundtrack compliments the typically Herzogian picture-perfect visuals.

This is a great film for those seeking an accessible introduction to film-as-art, and the legendary collaborations of Herzog and Kinski. It will likely annoy those who think of Dracula as a good looking romantic guy with a nasty habit, but is highly recommended for fans of Stoker's original work.


Reviewed by Don Fergusson ([email protected]) 5 / 10

Hypnotic and exquisitely photographed

Werner Herzog's version of Murnau's classic NOSFERATU is a captivating experience. Klaus Kinski is perfect as Count Dracula. He brilliantly conveys the loneliness and sadness of a creature who longs to be human. Count Dracula is the victim in this film, he does not enjoy his immortality and wants only to live, love and die like a human. Isabelle Adjani's ethereal beauty punctuates her ghostlike performance as Lucy, and Bruno Ganz turns in another solid performance as Jonathan.

Like other Herzog films, NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE is exquisitely photographed, eliciting an almost transcendental experience. Jonathan's journey to Dracula's castle, the dancing of the plague-ridden townsfolk, and the final scene are prime examples.

Once again, using the compositions of Popol Vuh and Wagner, Herzog creates an effective amalgamation of images an music.

One drawback to the film is that it is so beautiful to look at, it is not especially frightening. This may discourage some Dracula fans, but to those who want a hypnotic, smart vampire film, this is the one to see.

Reviewed by Gafke 10 / 10


Werner Herzog's remake of F. W. Murnau's classic film (the story for which Murnau stole without permission from Bram Stoker) is, thus far, my absolute favorite vampire film. I've only ever met one other person who made this claim. Everyone else said they were so bored by it that they either gave up on it or fell asleep in front of the TV.

I can understand this, even if I don't like it. Herzog's film moves at the pace of a fever dream, lingering long on shots of misty mountains and majestic rivers that some (like myself) will find breathtakingly beautiful, and others will find stunningly dull. This is a shame, but in these days of ten car chases, eight explosions and five sweaty sex scenes per film, I guess no one wants to appreciate the scenery as a main character anymore. Herzog has always had a knack for this, as anyone who has seen "Aguirre, the Wrath of God" well knows.

But, I digress. This version of Nosferatu, in places almost a frame for frame remake, is a masterpiece of homage. The slow, somewhat exaggerated reactions of his characters brilliantly echo the performances given by the silent actors in the original film. The landscape is moody and lovely and the sets are gorgeous, especially the phantom castle of The Count, haunted by memories and the strange ghost of a violin playing child. Lovely, ice-white Isabelle Adjani is here as the good and virtuous Lucy (the name reversal of the female characters is rather inexplicable, but it doesn't really matter) floating through the film like a beautiful dream and never once weakening in her faith, even in the face of ultimate horror. Bruno Ganz is somewhat stiff and unemotional, and one has to wonder why Lucy goes to such lengths to save this man who, for some reason, she loves with all her heart. Only in his moments of sickness and fear does Ganz emerge from his emotional void. But it is Klaus Kinski's incredible shadow that stretches over this film and swallows it whole.

Kinski plays his rat-faced, bald headed vampire with perfection. Yes, he complains about the loneliness of being undead, he laments his existence outside the realm of love and humanity, but he does it with a shrug instead of a whine, as if to say: "Yeah, I'm pretty much screwed, but what're ya gonna do?" He brings to his role of Vampire what very few actors (aside from Gary Oldman) have been able to: sympathy. He may hate what he has become, but he never apologizes for it. He is the ultimate scavenger, feeding off the dead and hiding in the darkness. Kinski's Count cannot even seduce. He simply takes. But his one scene with Isabelle is simply devastating, as he at long last reaches out to someone, hoping for love and salvation, and then quickly withdraws, the pain quite clear on his face, as he is sternly rejected.

The ending seems rather rushed and not very well thought-out; a true downer which basically nullifies the film. But the rest of the film is more than worth it, from the opening scenes of rotting mummies and bats flying in slow motion through to the muted spectacle of plague ridden madness as the dying dance in the streets to mournful background music. If you're expecting lots of splattering blood and half dressed girls writhing on their beds, then forget about appreciating this movie. You won't. But if you have a taste for grown-up fairy tales and stunning visuals, see this film.

Read more IMDb reviews


Be the first to leave a comment