Ride the Pink Horse


Action / Drama / Film-Noir / Mystery / Thriller


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January 26, 2016 at 05:59 AM


Thomas Gomez as Pancho
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719.15 MB
23.976 fps
1hr 41 min
P/S 2 / 3
1.52 GB
23.976 fps
1hr 41 min
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Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Cutter-2 10 / 10

A truly great film

An incredible film. There is so much going on and so much symbolism, the viewer cannot afford to miss a single moment. The great difficulty with attempting to make sense of most post WWII film noirs is that it is nearly impossible to relate to either the time in general or the turmoil the protagonist is going through after between one and three years in the somewhat surreal situation of extended combat. Attempting to `assimilate' to society can be extremely difficult. Many 'Nam vets can relate. At the time the film was made, just about everyone could relate because if they were not attempting to `assimilate' they knew someone who was.

The title comes from a scene where Lucky (Montgomery) wants to give Pilar (Hendrix) a free ride on Pancho's (Gomez) merry-go-round. Pilar asks Lucky which horse to ride and he replies, `Try the pink one'. What the merry-go-round is a metaphor of each viewer can decide. However, Pancho may give us a clue when during this exchange he states he gives no free rides.

Lucky is the typical movie G. I., brusque, rude and tougher than nails with apparently no real direction in life as evidenced by his cheap, rumpled suit and extremely free spending. Most assume he is out to revenge the killing of his war buddy, Shorty, by a gangster (Clark). Lucky is considered stupid because he could blackmail the gangster for much more than he is asking and essentially set himself up for life. However, Lucky recently left an environment where there was no guarantee of life beyond the moment. Is his motive actually revenge or could he be looking for something else? He recently survived a situation where his friends died on a regular basis and there was little or no opportunity for revenge. Can he even relate to revenge? You decide. At the end of the movie Lucky works out in his own mind a means of satisfying his motives. Enough said.

Pancho is the wise sage who periodically illuminates a situation with his light, off handed comments. The scheming, femme fatale (King) has a minor role, which is refreshing. However, the character who literally steals the show is Pilar a young, inexperienced, poor Indian girl who seems to mature into adulthood during the course of a few days. She attaches herself to Lucky at the beginning of the movie. The symbolism associated with her frequently appearing from behind buildings, out of alleys and hearing things no one else does is very strong and adds a true sense of mystery to the character. Retz ( blacklisted Art Smith), a government agent, and Pilar are often found protecting Lucky from himself. Pilar later explains to Retz that she befriended Lucky because she saw death in his face. Pilar assumes the `death' she saw is in the future but it could very well be that Lucky, after extended combat, is living a type of death at that moment. One of the movie's most compelling scenes is at the end when Lucky, knowing full well what he owes Pilar, has great difficulty determining how to say good-bye. Retz knows Lucky is struggling. Pilar, having greatly matured, understands either Lucky's predicament or `the facts of life' and handles the situation with the maturity of one well beyond her years. The beatings Pancho and Pilar take rather than betray Lucky also have strong symbolism, the weak defying the strong and eventually prevailing. Keep in mind this is 1947.

This is an extremely powerful movie that leaves so many questions unanswered, one cannot help but wonder long after the movie is over about what lead up to this small piece of Lucky's life, what was actually occurring during the movie and Lucky and Pilar's future.

Reviewed by ([email protected]) 9 / 10

This is a great movie based on a great book

I was in the process of reading this book and then started watching a movie without knowing what the movie was. It was deja vu all of the sudden. It turned out to be this movie. I think that Robert Montgomery did a great job of capturing the character that was in the book. Tough but naive at the same time. A very good noir film that should get more play and recognition.

The dark atmosphere,the craziness of the music and the partying in the background all the time as the story unfolds. Maybe I had a leg up reading the book almost first. It's very rare when I think a movie based on a book is just as good as the book. I felt sympathy for Robert Montgomery's character. All the time thinking he was going to lose to the cheats. He had his own principals and stuck to them.

Can't say enough.

Good movie.

Reviewed by mackjay 9 / 10

A Marvelous and Rarely Seen Film Noir

It is really unfortunate that this film is not available on video. Until it has more exposure, it will remain as obscure as its title. A prime example of the "sleeper", "Ride the Pink Horse" should be regarded as a singular member of the Noir canon. The film features "classic" noir elements: the femme fatale (with an interesting twist--are there two of them?), revenge motivation, an overall feeling of fatalism and impending doom, dark cinematography dominated by shadows and a solitary, enigmatic protagonist. What makes "Ride the Pink Horse" so unique is mainly its setting: a small Mexican town and an ongoing festival. Director Montgomery apparently shot the film during what looks like an authentic fiesta, with its images of ancient gods and rituals. This adds to the feeling of remoteness and mystery that characterize this movie. The title refers to a merry-go-round horse, and it is actually spoken at one point: the Mexican girl asks Lucky Gagin which horse she should ride. His response seems arbitrary and perhaps this ties in with the meaning of the film--our choices and connections happen by chance, yet they can dictate our entire lives. Gagin has come to the town on a single-minded mission of revenge, yet by the end everything has changed and been influenced by circumstances he could not have foreseen. "Ride the Pink Horse" has an archetypal Noir style: many scenes are shrouded in shadow or filmed in silhouette; most characters are ambiguous in their intent. All the actors are good: especially Thomas Gomez, who was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, and Fred Clark as a devious and nearly deaf villain. The beautiful Wanda Hendryx lends appropriate mystery to the Mexican girl. There is a lovely and evocative score using what sound like real Mexican tunes assembled by Frank Skinner.

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