Saturn 3

1980

Action / Adventure / Horror / Sci-Fi / Thriller

61
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 10%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 30%
IMDb Rating 5.1 10 6639

Synopsis


Uploaded By: OTTO
Downloaded 30,041 times
July 25, 2014 at 10:39 AM

Director

Cast

Kirk Douglas as Adam
Harvey Keitel as Benson
Roy Dotrice as Benson
720p 1080p
698.97 MB
1280*720
English
R
24.000 fps
1hr 36 min
P/S 5 / 6
1.24 GB
1920*1080
English
R
24.000 fps
1hr 36 min
P/S 1 / 6

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by t-birkhead 7 / 10

Pretty neat science fiction thriller

I saw this recently, late one Friday night on BBC2. It reminded me, though it isn't a horror film, of all the times I used to stay up in the past to watch old horror films, loving the fact that although few of them were spectacular, it was just fun to be able to see weird old b movies from the days when b grade genre pictures were often pretty decent. Saturn 3 has a small cast, comprising mainly Kirk Douglas, Farrah Fawcett as his wife, and Harvey Keitel as the sinister Captain James, who intrudes upon their cosy existence manufacturing food on Saturn 3. Farrah Fawcett looks nice and has a blandly appealing presence but isn't that much of an actress. Kirk Douglas brings a rugged, stoical gravitas to his role and is quite watchable, though his portrayal seems a bit stiff for the role. Its hard to judge Harvey Keitels performance since he was dubbed over. This is unfrotunate because it gives his human character a robotic feel. The film is fast paced, thrilling and wonderfully designed, with excellent special effects, especially Hector the robot. Hector is a great creation and has lots to do during the film, once it gets going. Also, as the film goes on, it seems to definitely have influenced the film Virus, with Jamie Lee Curtis, as well as other later science fiction films Though the characterisation seems a little weak the actors put their all into it and since the film becomes focused on the Hector and technological villainry the lightly drawn characters don't hurt too much. The screenplay runs swiftly and has sufficient vigor to paper over any cracks. Oddly, the screenplay is by acclaimed writer Martin Amis who penned great works such as Money or London Fields. Sadly the film has little of his sparkling language or savage wit but it does have a lot of excitement, some interesting themes and good dystopian details, especially in Keitel's characters attitudes. The final half hour or so is constantly tense and gripping, mounting to an inspired climax before a slightly weak final few moments. Sadly the film seems destined to mainly be seen in a truncated form instead of the 100 or so minute one mentioned on IMDb. The film definitely could have been more fleshed out, for there is the odd interesting point that is not expanded. However, the 85 or so minute cut is a such a tight, compelling ride that it is hard to criticise. With better acting, more characters or the 100 minute cut this could possibly have been really great. As it is I'd still definitely recommend it to science fiction or robot movie enthusiasts since its has some great ideas, effects that hold up well today and some good thrills. Worthwhile.

Reviewed by t-birkhead 7 / 10

Uneven but fairly enjoyable sci fi horror.

I saw this recently, late one Friday night on BBC2. It reminded me, though it isn't a horror film, of all the times I used to stay up in the past to watch old horror films, loving the fact that although few of them were spectacular, it was just fun to be able to see weird old b movies from the days when b grade genre pictures were often pretty decent. Saturn 3 has a small cast, comprising mainly Kirk Douglas, Farrah Fawcett as his wife, and Harvey Keitel as the sinister Captain James, who intrudes upon their cosy existence manufacturing food on Saturn 3. Farrah Fawcett looks nice and has a blandly appealing presence but isn't that much of an actress. Kirk Douglas brings a rugged, stoical gravitas to his role and is quite watchable, though his portrayal seems a bit stiff for the role. Its hard to judge Harvey Keitels performance since he was dubbed over. This is unfrotunate because it gives his human character a robotic feel. The film is fast paced, thrilling and wonderfully designed, with excellent special effects, especially Hector the robot. Hector is a great creation and has lots to do during the film, once it gets going. Also, as the film goes on, it seems to definitely have influenced the film Virus, with Jamie Lee Curtis, as well as other later science fiction films Though the characterisation seems a little weak the actors put their all into it and since the film becomes focused on the Hector and technological villainry the lightly drawn characters don't hurt too much. The screenplay runs swiftly and has sufficient vigor to paper over any cracks. Oddly, the screenplay is by acclaimed writer Martin Amis who penned great works such as Money or London Fields. Sadly the film has little of his sparkling language or savage wit but it does have a lot of excitement, some interesting themes and good dystopian details, especially in Keitel's characters attitudes. The final half hour or so is constantly tense and gripping, mounting to an inspired climax before a slightly weak final few moments. Sadly the film seems destined to mainly be seen in a truncated form instead of the 100 or so minute one mentioned on IMDb. The film definitely could have been more fleshed out, for there is the odd interesting point that is not expanded. However, the 85 or so minute cut is a such a tight, compelling ride that it is hard to criticise. With better acting, more characters or the 100 minute cut this could possibly have been really great. As it is I'd still definitely recommend it to science fiction or robot movie enthusiasts since its has some great ideas, effects that hold up well today and some good thrills. Worthwhile.

Reviewed by Jacob Abate (GasmaskAvenger) 8 / 10

Chaotic, misunderstood sci-fi cult flick that deserves better treatment.

In 1980, Saturn 3 was released. Since then it's been mocked, laughed at, even ripped-off by so-called "Classic" (Some actually deserved it, though.). Although it's rough on the edges, and suffers from some editing problems, effects, and a low budget, Saturn 3 is light-years better than any of the sci-fi crap that's churned out today (Not counting Revenge Of The Sith, which was good.), along with another underrated sci-fi cult hit Galaxy Of Terror. Unlike Galaxy, Saturn 3 was directed by producer (And best known for Singing In The Rain) Stanley Donen, who took over from original director (And special effects/set designer specialist) John Barry. His directing is fine, but along with him are Kirk Douglas (Who's often criticized for being too old to be stripped down in wearing nothing in some parts of the film, but this was made before he ACTUALLY became a decrepit, feeble old man, no offense Kirk.), Harvey Keitel (Who was unfairly dubbed by a stereotypical British dude i'm not familiar with), and Farrah Fawcet (Who's the weakest link of this film).

It opens with Keitel (Dressed in a awesome space suit) taking the job to take Hector (The key robot of the film.) to Saturn 3, a sanctionary of sorts to keep Earth plenished with food. Of course, he kills the real men meant for the job, and goes in the spaceship unnoticed. The opening is full of surreal, trippy, but awesome details, and gives us viewers some view of possible space life in the future. Keitel (Who's character is called Benson, and is referred as the Captain) arrives at Saturn 3, and is greeted by Adam & Alex (Douglas & Fawcet, which their characters' names are a nod to Adam & Eve.). Alex says Benson is weird, and Adam outright distrusts him. Alex has also never been to Earth. We then see Benson construct Hector, a big robot with the tinniest head in the world. He has a synthetic brain, and is programmed by taking information from Benson via a head plug (A concept stolen by The Matrix.) Benson gains a weird obsession towards Alex, said obsession is transferred to Hector, which leads to Hector going mad, killing a dog, then Benson later on. Then, it leads Adam to sacrifice his life to save Alex.

Saturn 3 contains some great designs, an interesting concept, a well-done execution, and some flaws. The flaws come from different places, mainly the casting of Fawcet. Some say this was vehicle for her showing off her skin, but due to the film's long history (Dating back to the early 70s, before Star Wars), it ain't. She makes her character a tad annoying, and seems to have not much to do except being fluff. She adds nothing, only causing a distraction from the real stars of the film, Keitel, Douglas, Hector, and the set design. Douglas & Keitel (Despite the awful decision to dub Keitel) are excellent, Hector is a creation of mystery to behold, the sets are great, and the score (Although brief) is cool and unforgettable. The effects work well, except for some really awful ones (Notably the one scene where Hector extends his arms after Adam tosses a crate at him, the riding through the rocks scenes, and, ugh, that one effect where Hector looks like a automated reject from Disneyworld's Epcot Center after getting pushed into the trap Adam and Alex made, although he was smart enough to avoid it first.). Despite these flaws, Saturn 3 is a great, forgotten sci-fi flick that needs to be seen and treated better, especially in the days of dreadful crap like "You Got Served", "Hustle & Flow", "Waist Deep", "Stargate The Series", "The Matrix Revolutions", and "Cars" (Which I haven't seen, nor I want to see it, due to my fear that it will be inferior to the CGI Animated masterpiece "The Incredibles"). See it, respect the effects (Which are still better than CGI), and don't laugh, you'll understand me better. If you see, or seen it, then go to www.PetitionOnline.Com/Saturn3/petition.html to support my petition to release a special edition, anamorphic widescreen, Uncut, remastered DVD. If you sign it, you will be thanked in the future. Trust me.

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