Shout at the Devil


Action / Adventure / Drama / Romance / Thriller / War


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May 21, 2014 at 12:05 AM



Roger Moore as Sebastian Oldsmith
Lee Marvin as Colonel Flynn O'Flynn
Ian Holm as Mohammed, O'Flynn's Mute Servant
Barbara Parkins as Rosa O'Flynn / Oldsmith
986.49 MB
23.976 fps
2hr 30 min
P/S 1 / 5

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by xredgarnetx 5 / 10


In SHOUT AT THE DEVIL, Roger Moore and Lee Marvin are a pair of misfits living in Africa just before World War 1. Moore is an elephant poacher and Marvin is a drunk living with his adult daughter (Barbara Parkins) in what is now Tanzania. Marvin and Moore fight over any little thing, not the least of which is the delectable daughter. But then they must work together to defeat the Germans at the onset of World War I. Seems the Germans have a battleship anchored in the cove, for repairs. At the behest of the British government, Marvin and Moore seek to destroy the ship before it can relaunch. Because of its age and director (Britisher Peter Hunt), the film looks creaky as all hell today. The fights are clumsily staged. The sincerity of the plot is questionable. Only Parkins seems to feel she is acting in a drama. Moore and Marvin play their parts very broadly. Even with bodies dropping like flies and both Moore and Marvin periodically being injured, you're not so sure this isn't a comedy. Is it worth a look? Not really.

Reviewed by lastliberal 8 / 10

A rollicking great action yarn (that was true!)

The first thing you notice about this film is the racist MPAA. Despite it being rated PG for war violence, there was nudity. Breasts were exposed, but they weren't those of Barbara Parkins ("Peyton Place", Valley of the Dolls, and her skintastic moment in Breakfast in Paris), but of African natives. Seems that black breasts are not taboo for children to see.

But, to the film itself. It is actually two films. The first half in 1912, has Lee Marvin (Cat Ballou, Paint Your Wagon) as a drunken ivory poacher who manages to get Roger Moore (The Spy Who Loved Me, "The Saint") to partner up with him. After Moore and Parkins (Marvin's daughter) plan to marry, there is a great fight scene reminiscent of many John Wayne pictures.

Then the film changes. World War I is declared and the Germans are on the march led by Reinhard Kolldehoff (Moon Over Parador, "The Winds of War"), a big fat German pig whose men slaughter Moore and Parkins baby, and set them on a search for revenge.

The film has plenty of action, including what I would call a paper mache bi-plane which almost takes Moore's life, and culminates in the blowing up of a German battleship that had run over Moore and Marvin earlier.

Marvin was extremely funny and Moore looked just great painted black to get on the ship. Parkins was radiant throughout, even when consumed with revenge for the murder of her baby.

Sir Ian Holm (Chariots of Fire) was also fantastic as Marvin's mute servant.

Reviewed by adam jezard 10 / 10

Shamefully treated classic

This is a splendid action/adventure of a type they just don't make any more, with excellent performances from Marvin and Moore that move from the comic to the dramatic. With rolling African scenery and a thunderous music score, not to mention Barbara Parkins as the love interest, and stunning direction by Peter (On Her Majesty's Secret Service) Hunt, this deserves to be much better known. Unfortunately it was lambasted by ignorant and ridiculous critics on both sides of the Atlantic upon its initial release, so it was re-edited and much of the more moving aspects of the film were cut out. As it stands, the video release and television versions in the UK show only about 2/3ds of the finished film. A few years ago a company called WideAppeal released a widescreen version on video, but this was some European print that contained much that had been cut from the US/UK version, but missed out instead much that the US/UK version had originally contained (much of it was also in German and undubbed or subtitled as I recall). WideAppeal must still be highly praised for releasing it on video. The British Film Institute had, when I inquired a few years ago, all of the original footage but had not got around to working on restoring the print to its original glory. I count myself lucky to have seen the original release print and feel annoyed and betrayed by the critics who savaged the film on its initial release (and the studio which reacted so swiftly to their meagre complaints) -- may you hang your heads in shame! I now only hope the BFI does its work swiftly so we can be presented with a version of the full film in all its glory.

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