Silence

2016

Adventure / Drama / History

186
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 84%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 70%
IMDb Rating 7.3 10 44806

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 752,955 times
March 16, 2017 at 06:33 AM

Cast

Adam Driver as Garupe
Liam Neeson as Ferreira
Andrew Garfield as Rodrigues
Ciarán Hinds as Father Valignano
720p 1080p
1.14 GB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
2hr 41 min
P/S 177 / 1,260
2.44 GB
1920*1080
English
R
23.976 fps
2hr 41 min
P/S 188 / 1,168

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by MisterWhiplash 10 / 10

Scorsese in Bergman/Dreyer mode, and it's amazing

It's Scorsese. Martin Scorsese. He makes the best films. Is this one of his best? Hmm....

It's a personal/religious epic, but it's all about the interior self - an intimate epic, which is always the toughest to pull off. Silence chronicles morality in such a way that is staggering and with very few specks of light (that is, brief relief through laughter - it does come through the character Kichijiro, more on him in a moment), and it's practically an anomaly to be released by a major studio with such a budget and big stars. This is a story that comes from history you rarely ever get to see anymore - history from a country like Japan that doesn't involve samurai (at least how we see them) and dealing with Christianity vs Buddhism - and it's directed with a level of vision, I mean in the true, eye-and-heart opening sense that declares that this man still has a lot to say, maybe more than ever, in his latter years.

Silence is, now pondering it hours after seeing it, possibly the best "faith-based" film ever made (or at least since Last Temptation of Christ); in its unintentional way, a great antidote to those pieces of garbage like God's Not Dead and War Room which preach only to a select few and insult the intelligence of everyone else. In this story of Jesuit priests who go on a journey to find a priest who may be long gone but could be found and brought home, it's meant for adults who can and should make up their own minds on religion and God, and the persecution part of it isn't some ploy from the filmmakers for fraudulent attention. This is about exploring what it means if you have faith, or how to question others who do, and what happens when people clash based on how people see the sun. Literally, I'm serious.

It's also heavier than most other films by this director, which is good but also tough to take on a first viewing. And yet it feels always like a Scorsese film, not only due to the rigorous craft on display (I could feel the storyboards simmering off on to the screen, I mean that as a compliment, this is staggeringly shot by Rodrigo Prieto, I'm glad Scorsese's found another guy), or the performances from the main actors (Garfield is easily giving his all, and not in any cheesy way, Driver's solid, Neeson seems to be paying some sort of penance for some mediocre action fare), but because of a key character: Kichijiro.

He's someone who really fits in to the Scorsese canon of characters who are so tough to take - he makes things difficult for Rodrigues, to say the least, and yet keeps coming back like some sad pathetic dog who can't make up his mind - but, ultimately, the toughest thing of all for this Father, as it must be for this filmmaker, is 'I know he is weak and irrational and probably bad in some way... but he must be loved as all of other God's children.' So as far as unsung performances for 2016 go, Yôsuke Kubozuka follows in a tradition set out by none other than De Niro (think of him in Mean Streets and Raging Bull, it's like that only not quite so angry).

I may need another viewing to fully grasp it. But for now, yes, see it, of course. For all its length and vigorous explorations and depictions of suffering (occasionally highly graphic), not to mention the, for Scorsese, highly unusual approach of a lack of traditional (or any) music or score, it's unlike anything you'll see in cinema this year, maybe the decade, for pairing the struggle of a man to reconcile his God and his responsibility to others in a repressive regime with the visual splendor of something from another time - maybe Kurosawa if he'd had a collaboration with Bergman. And yet for all of this high praise, there's also a feeling of being exhausted by the end of it. Whether that exhaustion extends to other viewings I'm not sure yet. As a life-long "fan" of this director, I was impressed if not blown away.

Reviewed by www.ramascreen.com 8 / 10

The latest temptation of Martin Scorsese

With regards to Martin Scorsese's SILENCE, let me just put it this way, I saw Scorsese's 1988's "The Last Temptation Of Christ," back when I was in college, as you know that film was also an adaptation, and I thought it was pure masterpiece just in terms of its themes because whether or not you'd want to argue that perhaps that some of the approach may have been sacrilegious or religiously inconsiderate, if you will, to me it was about wondering the what if's and whether or not doubt has any footing in order for faith to grow. To a certain extent, SILENCE conveys something similar.

Based on Shusaku Endo's novel, SILENCE is about two Jesuit missionaries who travel to Japan because they have heard that their mentor, Father Ferreira (Liam Neeson) has publicly denounced God. At the time, Christianity was outlawed in Japan, so in their search for their missing mentor, they endure torture, suffering, and the ultimate test of faith.

In a way you could say that SILENCE is Martin Scorsese's way of paying respect to the legendary filmmaker Akira Kurosawa especially for us fans who grew up watching old time Japan's samurai classics, although SILENCE is not action-driven obviously, but the authoritarian rule depicted in this film is definitely something that's culturally based on that particular era.

From technical standpoint, SILENCE is as rich and complex as the story itself, even the violence is done in a graphic yet artistic manner. Because the story is told through Andrew Garfield's Father Rodrigues' perspective, you'll find some of the shots from inside his prison cell, looking out, with the frame being in between the wooden bars, to be quite engrossing. It makes the tension all the more real because your mind just keeps racing, you don't know how much more gruesome it would get. Odd to say this but it sort of becomes a point of anticipation, it's as if every other half-hour or so, you know some Christians are going to get tortured and so you're just bracing for impact. Martin Scorsese's ever-so-reliable high standard quality filmmaking is present through and through, so there's no disappointing you there.

After being religious and full of conviction in "Hacksaw Ridge" as a Seventh-Day Adventist, actor Andrew Garfield becomes religious and full of conviction again, this time in "Silence" and what's interesting is that both films feature Japanese people. All that aside, this is yet another evidence of Garfield's commitment to his work, the same goes for Adam Driver and Liam Neeson who not only went through physical changes, you actually feel a bit concerned for their health, but that conviction is shown in their eyes. It's amazing to see how this former Spider-Man quickly this powerful force. The Japanese actors are equally outstanding, especially Issey Ogata whose performance has his own flamboyant way of being ruthless.

This is Scorsese's long passion project, he had been wanting to do this film for years, but the question remains, and those of you who've watched the film are probably wondering it as well. And my answer is no, I don't think SILENCE means to demonize Buddhism. If this film is Scorsese's way of promoting Christianity, then that is his prerogative. But throughout mankind's history, there had been many cases in many lands where the majority religion, whatever religion that maybe, persecutes the minority religion because they view them as a dangerous threat; a symbol of a potential takeover. Inquisitions have happened everywhere. Which leads me back to what I said earlier about how SILENCE reminds me a lot of "The Last Temptation Of Christ," we see men who are supposed to be like rocks, seemingly falter and start to question their faith, but perhaps questioning your faith is one way of reaffirming it. Liam Neeson's character in this film has a counter argument to Andrew Garfield's Rodrigues and he may make a bit of sense if you see it from his version of truth.

-- Rama's Screen --

Reviewed by Joshua H. 10 / 10

Scorsese Does it Again!!!

"Silence" is Martin Scorsese's latest masterpiece of cinema that he's brought us since his 2013 hit "The Wolf of Wall Street". "Silence" follows two Jesuit priests played by Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver who invoke on a mission to go to Japan to find and rescue their mentor, Father Ferreira (played by Liam Neeson) and to spread the faith to the Japanese at the same time.

"Silence" was a film that Scorsese spent the past few decades trying to make and even though it took him such a long time to bring this powerful story to the big screen I'm just glad that it got made. "Silence" is adapted from the novel of the same name by Japanese author, Shusaku Endo. I read the book and loved it and the movie is just as up to par as the book. This is one of the best adaptations of a book I've ever seen, the movie has all the plot points, themes, and messages the book had and brought it to the screen flawlessly.

The acting in this film is phenomenal. Every person in this film is on the top of their game no matter how big or small their role was in this film. Andrew Garfield's performance in "Silence" better get him that golden statue because he gave such a powerful and emotionally draining performance to the point that I forgot that I'm even watching a movie. Seeing Liam Neeson actually give a dramatic and emotional performance was great, it was nice to see him take his time to be in this film and not go off and do another mediocre action movie.

The cinematography is absolutely gorgeous in this film and there's not one shot that feels out of place or out of focus. Scorsese directs the hell out of this movie and never loses focus one bit, he better get nominated for best director for the Oscars.

One thing I will say about "Silence" is that it is very long and very hard to watch at times. Considering that the film is about the test of one man's faith automatically seems like an emotionally draining film, it's nowhere what you thought you'd imagine while watching this film. You see our protagonist (Garfield) go through hell and back while watching and experiencing such horrific things. There were times where I teared up and there were times where I grimaced, and there were times where I just wanted to see the suffering end. If there were to be another title of this film it would be called "Suffering", no joke.

What else can I say, Scorsese pulls another masterpiece out of the box and deserves all the credit he deserves for just making this film alone. If you love Scorsese's work I highly suggest you to go see "Silence" because this is one of his finests without a doubt.

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