The Finest Hours


Action / Drama / History / Thriller


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May 12, 2016 at 07:12 AM


Chris Pine as Bernie Webber
Ben Foster as Richard Livesey
Eric Bana as Daniel Cluff
Holliday Grainger as Miriam Webber
720p 1080p
875.75 MB
23.976 fps
1hr 57 min
P/S 38 / 230
1.8 GB
23.976 fps
1hr 57 min
P/S 27 / 156

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by bankofmarquis 7 / 10

Edge of your seat action

The FINEST HOURS is a rip-roaring, edge of your seat action thriller that will keep you guessing all the way to the end.

There....that should get me on the poster.

That said, I will have to admit that I had low to middling expectations going into this film and it exceeded my expectation in almost every way.

Starting with the Cast. Chris Pine (good ol' Cap't Kirk) stars as Bernie Webber a mid-level Coast Guard officer who is flung into the forefront when an oil barge splits in half in very rough sees during a storm. Pine presents Webber not as a square-jawed hero, but a real person with doubts and insecurities but a strict code of ethics and when his Capt. (the always capable Eric Bana) sends him out for what could be a suicide mission, he goes out.

While Pine holds down half of this movie, Casey Affleck holds down the other half as the leader of the group of survivors on the oil tanker. Normally, I am not a big fan of Affleck's work, but in this movie, I sure am. He is a man of few words and tells much with his expression. If there is a "squared jawed hero" in this movie, it is Affleck.

These two are supported by a veritable who's who of "that guy" actors. Ben Foster, John Ortiz, Michael Raymond James and good ol' Abraham Benrubi are just the tip of the iceberg, so to speak, of wonderful character actors filling the roles of other Coast Guard members and crewmen of the doomed ship.

Only Holliday Grainger as Pine's strong-willed fiancé fails for me, but I blame a weak written character more than her acting for that one.

But, make no mistake, it is the action that makes this movie exciting. From the opening where the oil ship splits in half through the attempt to get out to the ocean to find the doomed ship to the actual rescue itself, I was on pins and needles, literally vaulting myself up out of my seat to get over a wave at one point. Director Craig Gillespie, not known as an action director, does a nice job of leading us through these scenes, I am anxious to see what he takes on next. I hope it is another action flick.

Is it a great film? No. The opening (after the tanker accident) drags and the movie bounces around in tone trying to find out what kind of movie it wants to be, but once Pine and company goes out to sea to rescue, the movie zips along just fine.

7 (out of 10) stars and you can take that to the Bank (of Marquis)

Reviewed by Gino Cox 5 / 10

Three intersecting stories, of which one works very well

"The Finest Hours" presents three stories, or perhaps one story from three perspectives. The stories are perhaps better described as intersecting rather than interwoven as developments in each storyline have relatively little effect on the other story lines other than points of intersection.

The most successful story is one of survival aboard a doomed ship in a fierce storm. Casey Afflect delivers a brilliant performance, possibly the best of his career, as an engineer who must win the respect of the crew and devise a seeming impossible plan to ensure their survival.

But the putative hero of the story is played by Chris Pine as a disgraced seaman thrust into a leadership position who manages a heroic rescue by alternatively slavishly adhering to regulations and blatantly disregarding them, but steadfastly pressing on by sheer obstinacy and succeeding by dumb luck.

The least successful story is a romance between Pine's character and a local girl who somehow manages to afford a car on a switchboard operator's salary, walks through snowdrifts in high heels without slipping or marring her shine, defies convention and embarrasses her boyfriend by proposing marriage, and barges into the all-male preserve of the Coast Guard station to demand that the commander commit an unconscionable act of cowardice in an exchange that might have been ghostwritten by the screenwriter's five- year-old daughter.

Having never read the book, it's difficult to tell what parts were embellished for dramatic impact, but much of the story seems hopelessly contrived. Critical pieces of equipment (radar, compass, radio) malfunction and miraculously return to service as if on cue. At one point, a large group of bystanders race off in support of the rescue effort and one expects them to activate certain items, but strangely nobody does until the love interest does, almost as an afterthought, and everybody else decides to follow suit, leaving the audience wondering why they went there if they didn't intend to do it in the first place. At another somebody shouts out a number referring to a group of people he could not possibly have counted.

This is another film that the #OscarsSoWhite and advocates of gender pay parity would rather audiences not see. It's basically a story of real men in the 1950s male-dominated era doing manly things while the womenfolk stay at home being supportive, raising children and mourning those who sacrificed their lives supporting their families. It was only four years after Eisenhower ended segregation in the military and the Coast Guard and various maritime labor unions were probably about as integrated as the Ku Klux Klan.

But this would never do in the twenty-first century when studios feel pressured to compromise dramatic structure in favor of political correctness. Consequently, two subplots seem to have been added and/or expanded to provide more diversity for audiences who prefer diversity over drama. One involves a black seaman whose cowardice results in the death of a Caucasian who takes him under his wing. The second is the romantic subplot, which is given roughly equal weight and screen time with the two other through lines. The story is not particularly interesting. The girl is a typical chick flick heroine – pretty but not gorgeous, more cherubic than voluptuous, virtuous and steadfast to a fault, with an anachronistic feminist streak. Both subplots could have been easily eliminated. Perhaps the film would not have been quite the critical or commercial disappointment if they had been sharply trimmed or eliminated.

The theme and moral seem weak. A theme concerning luck and happenstance undermines some of the effect, as do several plot contrivances, such as the equipment malfunctions. The episode is supposedly one of the greatest sea rescues in history, but it's presented as the consequence of doggedly plodding along in blind subservience to duty rather than anything one would ordinarily equate with heroism.

Technically, the film is top shelf. The period props, costumes, settings and make-up all seem authentic. There is a refreshing lack of distracting jiggly-cam shots. The special effects seem realistic. It lays on the schmaltz fairly heavily at points, but what can one expect from Disney?

It might have been more compelling if it had concentrated on the survival story, eliminated the love story and trimmed the rescue story.

Reviewed by trublu215 5 / 10

While it has its heart in the right place, The Finest Hours can't seem to rise above its sappy melodramatic storyline.

The Finest Hours tells the harrowing and courageous true story of the most daring rescue mission that the U.S. Coast Guard has, to this day, ever had to accomplish. Starring Chris Pine, Casey Affleck, Ben Foster and Josh Stewart, the film's cast is stacked to the brim with talent but the director, Craig Guillesspe takes away from their efforts by telling the story in the sappiest of ways. The film starts with Bernie Webber (Chris Pine) on a blind date with his friend as he looks forward to meeting Miriam (Holliday Grainger), the woman he has been talking on the phone with for months on end. It is a sappy way to start the film but that sappiness is soon discarded as soon as we are introduced to the USS Pendelton and its crew. The crew, headed by Casey Affleck's brilliant and film carrying performance as Ray Sybert, is in the midst of a terrible winter storm and they struggle to maintain control of the ship. After being battered by the brutal waves off of Nantucket, the ship is split in two and must stay afloat until help arrives. The film takes its shape during the scenes with the Pendleton and it's crew. Casey Affleck gives a good performance that remains as one of the most interesting of the film coupled with some truly gasp-worthy scenes of suspense and action. This is one thing the film has going for it, it has some truly breath taking action sequences that will leave you clawing at your arm rest and holding your breath. While an abundance of CGI is used, it still feels the way its supposed to. Cold and brutal. While the film is no match for the conditions shown in The Revenant, it still will make you shiver once or twice just looking at the weather these brave souls have to go up against. While these sequences and qualities make The Finest Hours a thoroughly watchable and enjoyable film, unfortunately the film compromises, what could be, white knuckle action and substitute it with a half-assed love story between Bernie and Miriam that borders on annoying after the first hour and equally annoying and poorly done Boston accents. The accents show Pine and Grainger as the biggest culprits. Grainger's performance as Miriam is annoying and wildly unrealistic and Pine is spineless in his rendition of, what many consider, one of the bravest men that ever served in the Coast Guard. Grainger's Miriam serves as more of a nuisance than a help to the film, which is rather disappointing because the role screams for a more able actress to take on the role and another screenwriter to make her character more than just a poorly written female character. It really throws the film for a loop, making it as lopsided as you can get. Despite this, the film moves through its main storyline with tenacity that is hard to match. One sequence in particular features the rescue crew trying to pass over the Nantucket ocean bar, a point in the ocean that features out going and incoming waves crashing against one another. The sequence is harrowing, the pacing of it is brilliant and the sheer intensity is one that the film can't seem to match for the remainder of the film. The film, while it does get your heart pounding, lacks character drama and depth. While we care about the characters, we only care about the actors playing them. If lesser known actors were in these roles, it would be clearer that the film could have used another rewrite and a stronger female character. Overall, The Finest Hours is a decent rescue film that serves its purpose of entertaining you but it does little else in the way of separating it from every other film of its type.

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