The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies


Adventure / Fantasy


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March 06, 2015 at 06:44 PM



Evangeline Lilly as Tauriel
Benedict Cumberbatch as Smaug / Necromancer
Cate Blanchett as Galadriel
Lee Pace as Thranduil
3D 720p 1080p
2.06 GB
23.976 fps
2hr 24 min
P/S 2 / 22
934.25 MB
23.976 fps
2hr 24 min
P/S 28 / 161
2.06 GB
23.976 fps
2hr 24 min
P/S 46 / 180

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Lawrence Archibald von Austerlitz 2 / 10

Unequivocally Terrible

Peter Jackson, with this new trilogy, which adapts a somewhat long children's fairy tale into a three-part action epic, each movie being three hours long and delving into completely irrelevant stories that are only hinted at in Tolkien's body of work, has really destroyed his reputation as the Tolkien translator. He will always live in the shadow of The Lord of the Rings, which is a sumptuous, beautiful, heartrending, thrilling masterpiece.

I don't know what happened. But Jackson sacrificed tone, realism, characterization, and story when he adapted The Hobbit. It is unrecognizable as work by the same director.

There are so many problems with this trilogy and this movie that is nigh impossible to list them. Nearly every scene is a real travesty, and the whole operation is an affront to the source material and fans of LOTR. The movies make hyper-violent beheadings and mass slaughter into orgies of staged action sequences and dumb gags. The orcs, which are now entirely computer-generated, are no longer compelling or realistic, and they are seemingly significantly more fearsome than in LOTR... It takes what the audience understands about Middle Earth and makes it BIGGER, in a completely childish overextension of the original story, to make things even more epic! Were-worms and enormous bats - these don't exist in the larger and more climactic battle in LOTR, but sure, they existed back then, right? Sure! Jackson also turns characters into absolutely ridiculous flat caricatures. Thranduil, the bourgeois blue-blood riding an elk, Dain, Thorin's cousin, who rests his enormous high- pitched Scottish girth on a wild boar, the she- elf who falls in love with a dwarf... It's stomach churning how Peter Jackson has combined a love for extreme violence and an eye for juvenile gags and unbelievable characters, and in a beloved, classic setting.

This movie, once again, extends Legolas past human bounds, past elven bounds, past the bounds of Newtonian physics, as he sprints, newly cyan eyes shining, on falling bricks and hangs from bats. We get to watch dwarfs behead seiging armies of orcs, who are impotent to the blows of the tiny Olympians. Again, oh no!, Middle Earth is doomed, the age of men is over, (cue slow-motion shots of Gandalf looking stricken, Thorin killing orcs with Sparta kicks)... The feel, the script, the look is all taken from LOTR and rehashed with this cast of cardboard characters, in a badly rendered world of excess and fancy.

I expected mature film-making for thoughtful audiences expecting real characters living in a real world with a compelling story, but obviously that was too much to expect.

If one of the important themes of The Hobbit is the rejection of greed, as we can see personified by Thorin, then is it hypocritical that Hollywood has churned out three abominably shallow and violent films out of The Hobbit for the public's consumption? I think so. I hate what these films represent, and what they could have done.

Reviewed by micha-jetter 5 / 10

Entertaining Popcorn-Cinema - No Less, But Also No More

When I left the movie-theater after seeing it at the midnight-screening of my local theater, I was greatly conflicted about what to think about it. On the one hand, it was great popcorn cinema in that it was very much entertaining and, of course, visually striking. On the other hand, it simply topped my highest expectations about how many scenes made me go: "Aw, you gotta be kidding me...". Those scenes definitely did make me grin and feel some kind of joy, but also they made me shudder - and it just wouldn't stop.

The Lord of the Rings had it's "silly" moments, scenes that made you laugh or grin amidst the seriousness and darkness. I felt that those were refreshing changes of mood, and they are burnt into my mind - Legolas sliding down the stairs on a shield while shooting orcs, Legolas bringing down the Oliphants, Gimly being thrown over to the bridge at Helm's Deep. With The Hobbit, not only, but especially The Battle of the Five Armies, moments like this follow each other like canned laughter on Two and a Half Men. Here, the more serious scenes are a refreshing change to all the cheesiness, the ridiculousness and the exaggertion.

I did like some of the character development especially the inner confliction of Thorin, Thranduil and Bilbo. Yet, the resolutions to these conflicts didn't quite satisfy me, they simply came too quick and too "easy". I feel like this was an aspect where the story could've been made quite a bit more thrilling.

To conclude my major points: The Hobbit - the Battle of the Five Armies once again brings you back to Middle Earth, and that alone made it worth watching for me. However, it can be quite a disappointment if you expect a grand finale in every aspect for the "Middle Earth" saga, because only the extent of the battle-scenes and the visuals life up to that, while other aspects - story, setting, mood, character development and -relations lag miles behind the Lord of the Rings trilogy. If you've seen the first two parts, you shouldn't be too surprised about that. Prepare to be surprised nevertheless.

Reviewed by Sarah Anderson 1 / 10

The Hobbit: Battle of the Dwarfs, Elves, Orcs, Humans, Trolls, Giant Worms, Pigs, Goats, Eagles, and Anything Else That Peter Jackson Thought Would Make Money

I was as irritated as most people when I heard that Peter Jackson would split The Hobbit into three movies because it was obviously a decision based on nothing more than getting as much money as possible, but even I never imagined that he would stoop to making a movie like Battle of the Five Armies (a.k.a. Battle of the 25 Armies plus a couple of random giant mountain goats and a pig thrown in for good measure).

The CGI was as bad as something you would see in a B movie—even worse than the previous two Hobbit films. But even more noticeably, the script took a dive to rock bottom. Within the first half hour, such utterly laughable cliches as "You make me feel alive," were spoken in a cheesy love scene that seemed like something straight out of Saturday Night Live, except that the audience was apparently supposed to take it seriously.

Shortly before the battle started, there were a few much-needed moments of comic relief, and I thought the film might possibly turn around. But all my illusions were soon shattered during the ten-minute scene where Thorin walks on top of the ice that Azog is floating under with his eyes open, following the orc and apparently waiting for him to break through it, when—surprise!—he does, and (spoiler for those who have not yet watched the ten-minute scene that made this obvious) kills Thorin. Alas. It might have been sad if I hadn't been waiting around for ten minutes knowing that he would get killed.

Things were looking grim for the dwarfs when who should appear? Our heroes the eagles, of course, who have managed to bail out the protagonists in every single movie of the trilogy.

Although I couldn't stop laughing during the scene where three dwarfs find completely random giant mountain goats with no riders in the middle of the battle and proceed to ride them up a mountain, the worst part of the movie was easily the ending. As if the movie isn't long enough, the audience is not only forced to watch Bilbo go all the way BACK to the Shire, they have to re-watch footage from Fellowship of the Ring! I knew it was a bad sign that Peter Jackson actually made a movie shorter than three hours (although it felt like six)—apparently, he had so little material for this movie that he had to re-use material from his original trilogy.

When Tauriel discusses love with the abominably cliched line "Why does it hurt so much?" I think she described the feelings of most of the audience enduring the latest Hobbit movie.

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