The Rum Diary


Action / Comedy / Drama


Uploaded By: OTTO
Downloaded 71,876 times
January 30, 2012 at 11:37 AM



Amber Heard as Chenault
Johnny Depp as Kemp
Giovanni Ribisi as Moberg
Aaron Eckhart as Sanderson
728.50 MB
23.976 fps
2hr 0 min
P/S 6 / 14

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Lauren-Leigh Flower 9 / 10

'Heres to Pretty women, with dirty thoughts'

I adored the novel, The Rum Diary and as an aid worker I related to many of the character's struggles. Although the film does stray quite a bit from the book itself, I think it's a perfect homage to Hunter S Thompson. The language still reeks of his Gonzo fury writing and manages to transport the audience into a drunken rant, as well as secretly educating them on the struggles of a free press. It had me laughing out loud on more than one occasion, as well as the packed out cinema that I viewed it with.

I rated this movie a 9 and the last film I rated that high was The Shining. I personally think this film was perfect. The leading actress/actors were perfect and the supporting cast phenomenal, especially Giovanni Ribisi. The only problem with this film in my opinion is that if you are not a fan of the gibbering, artistically nervous tone of most of Thompson's work, this film may be too heavy for you. Although it's easier to follow that Fear and Loathing (which scrupulously stuck to the dialogue from the novel Fear and loathing), many would find the dialogue bizarre.

Personally I loved every minute of this film and think it's already truly underrated.

Reviewed by jeremypb 5 / 10

bad representation of an amazing book

If you have had the pleasure of reading the great book from Hunter S. Thompson, "The Rum Diary" this film is not for you. And even if you did not read the book, this film lacks drama, cinematic style, character arcs, a hooking intro, and satisfying end. I am not sure if the writer/director Bruce Robinson spent the time to really READ the book. It's a DARK comedy, not a lighthearted love story. Hunter S. Thompson (played by Johnny Depp) was very depressed at the time, getting wasting, working minimal amounts, and having sex with any Puerto Rican girl that was interested. None of this was portrayed accurately in the film.

One key factor that Bruce Robinson screwed up was eliminating the character of Yemon, which was crucial in the book. Instead this Robinson combined three characters into two, which isn't true to the book and does not work on screen. Another factor missed was the bar Al's which played a big role in the book. This was the local bar in which all the works at the newspaper went to everyday and got wasted at. Besides the two lead characters in the film, all the workers were alcoholics and Robinson failed at exposing the working environment of the newspaper.

The ending of the book was tremendous; the boss Lotterman has a heart attack and dies when he thinks one of the employees was going to beat him up. Instead of using this great ending handed to him, Bruce Robinson steered away from that and it fell flat at the end.

All in all, when adapting a book like "The Rum Diary," you have to stay true to the heart (balls) of the story. Bruce Robinson missed the dark tone of the book, did not develop the characters and the environment to its fullest extent. On top of that did a terrible job of exposing the beautiful landscape of Puerto Rico, shooting everything much too tight not allowing the viewer to get a true feel of the surroundings and native people. Instead of wasting your ten bucks at the cinema sit down relax and read an amazing book by Hunter S. Thompson, "The Rum Diary."

Reviewed by bkrauser-81-311064 5 / 10

Lacks Coherency or Flair

The film begins with main character Paul Kemp (Johnny Depp) waking up in a luxurious hotel room in Puerto Rico after a heavy night of drinking. After chomping down a few aspirin, Kemp stumbles into the editors office of the San Juan Star and is given a dead end writing job. After a few chance encounters, Kemp becomes the center of intrigue and corruption while consuming copious amounts of alcohol.

"The Rum Diary" was originally a novella from the twisted mind of Hunter S. Thompson an eccentric journalist and novelist who in addition to smoking, snorting, injecting, drinking every drug, alcohol and carcinogen known to man, managed to change the face of journalism by calling it as he sees it. His writing can repel and enchant with equal measure and has a breakneck spontaneity which is rivaled by its frazzled incoherency.

Incoherency would be the best word to describe this film. The story lacks any kind of focus jumping from a love story, a corrupt land deal, drunken antics, workplace politics and racial tensions. Watching "The Rum Diary" was liking talking to a drunk grad student; little flashes of genius may linger but after what seems like four hours you realize you're talking to a drunken idiot and looking for the door.

Thompson's other work adapted to screen shares a similar inconsistency but say what you will about "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" at least it was interesting. Director Bruce Robinson seems unsure behind the camera trying desperately to balance themes and while Terry Gilliam threw spaghetti at the wall to see what sticks, Robinson compensates by drawing out its screen time and keeping the camera-work and editing as dull and uninspiring as possible.

The films only saving grace is the inclusion of Giovanni Ribisi as a cirrhosis addled, syphilitic cohort who takes LSD while listening to records of Nazi propaganda. His arguments with the Star's head editor (Richard Jenkins) provide some of the few precious moments of humor.

The epilogue appears while Johnny Depp sails into the horizon explaining that while its the end of the story "...its the beginning of another." I would have liked to have seen the other story. At least by then the sardonic wit of Thompson was finally present.

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