The Void

2016

Horror / Mystery / Sci-Fi

26
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 74%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 53%
IMDb Rating 5.8 10 9094

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 131,704 times
April 28, 2017 at 05:32 PM

Cast

Ellen Wong as Kim
Kenneth Welsh as Dr. Richard Powell
Stephanie Belding as Beverly
Aaron Poole as Daniel Carter
720p 1080p
659.86 MB
1280*720
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 30 min
P/S 84 / 335
1.37 GB
1920*1080
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 30 min
P/S 78 / 357

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Zenerat 9 / 10

Modern horror masterpiece

The premise of this movie at first feels like a simple creature feature. It's standard horror fare set in a hospital, but this movie goes a little higher concept in its aspirations. There is a lot here just below the surface. The creature effects were some of the best I've ever seen which is unsurprising when you find out that the two directors were respectively a makeup artist and an art director for many years before. All the effects look like they were done practically and if there is any cgi it's unnoticed except for one unfortunate green screen scene. The action was explosive and cathartic in nature. Mostly this film just gives a sense of dread, a sense of insignificance. It doesn't feel like there is any way that these people will survive what is being thrown at them. I'd call it the best Doom movie we will ever get because it does give a good sense of what our collective imaginations have decided hell is like. The triangles and the cult aspect were also welcome additions and the aesthetics it adds subtly changes your reaction to the film in a way I would not have expected. This was one of the best theater horror experiences I've ever had and one of the best modern horror movies I've seen.

Reviewed by fox_davidson 8 / 10

A remarkable throwback creature feature

I attended a screening of The Void at the Nevermore film festival in Durham, NC. It was a remarkable throwback to classic John Carpenter-style films. I hesitate to list too many details about it, since the feel of the film is very much like a nightmare that might be spoiled if you go in knowing how it turns out. I can say that the creature designs were some of the best I've seen on film in recent years. The feel of the film reminded me a great deal of Silent Hill, perhaps because it shares a lot of the same influences.

My few criticisms have to do with the screenplay. The filmmakers do a good job of leaving some mystery, but there's a bit of exposition I felt like I missed that would explain why some of the people take the actions they do. Even so, that didn't detract from the film enough for me to stop enjoying it. It's a minor miracle how nice the film looks given its low budget. The production design was just outstanding. Considering how ambitious the feature is, I think missing the mark by a bit in certain areas is forgivable.

Reviewed by MisterWhiplash 5 / 10

half the work was done here. guess which half?

On the effects and style end, The Void is an example to all of those filmmakers who say "fix it in post" and want to only use CGI blood instead of actual syrup mixed with whatever. It's an often grotesque display of what can be done with rubber and latex and some imagination. Is it the *most* imaginative use of practical effects? Perhaps not, but it's a lot of the time in the designs, and that the lighting is often cued to make us see the creatures and monsters and tentacles so that it's just real enough without becoming fake. And there are some unsettling choices in direction and atmosphere - how we first are introduced to the mind-control aspect involving a nurse with a scalpel and a face as revealed to be pretty much (gulp) torn off is exciting and disgusting. These directors weren't lazy when it came to effects, but unfortunately they became lazy when it came time to do the *work* of a movie script.

These characters and the plot that are cooked up for The Void are half-baked, and the actors, while not necessarily bad, are not given enough to rise up to a challenge of doing something more than what their one (or simply half) dimensional characters require them to do. The set-up is The Thing with a bit of Night of the Living Dead and then there's I'm sure a butt-load of Lovecraft there too, as a small town cop and a few locals (including the cop's pregnant wife, who we don't find out is so until later on) are trapped in a hospital as strange, white hooded figures (no KKK component with that, by the way, they're more like evil monks one sees in horror with cult scnarios) with some powers that sometimes get sort of explained, and other time (mostly) do not. It's a siege movie where people walk slowly in dark hallways and down to dark cellars, and one of the stakes is that the pregnant girl may give birth at any moment. Plus, there may be a... inter- dimensional portal of some kind?

This is a movie made by people who clearly (nakedly) love their influences (and maybe smoked a good amount of weed possibly before the script writing process, maybe during too), but they didn't put in what has to be done to make us care about the characters. This is a story where people keep acting mean and obnoxious to one another because, well, DANGER! But one of the aspects of a movie like Carpenter's The Thing is that we get to know and like the characters, and while they're types the actors do a lot of good work to help flesh out the characters too. In here, the actors often have one expression planted on their faces, and it stays there whether it's panic or mean consternation or... more panic. And while I mention that the movie has some good atmosphere, it's not directed with a distinguishing vision that would set it as something unique: a lot of hand-held when it has to get intense, a music cue that comes in when a character does a surprise move into a room or reveal in a shot (and music that becomes extremely loud and *TELLING YOU THIS IS SCARY TIME*-like during some of the more gruesome scenes).

But more than with the characters, I don't think the writers/directors did a good job selling us on what the mythology is supposed to be. There's a lot of symbolism involving these triangles and shots of dark-ominous clouds rolling in the sky, and, obviously, there is some fantastical/outer-space/interdimensional things going on. Although we do eventually get two scenes where separate villainous characters monologue to other characters - one being someone who is curiously strapped down with some scary medical things about to happen, and the reveal is a good troubling sight, while the other fills in only the slightest gaps in logic and this by the climax - I wanted to know more about the rules here.

There's mind-control and there's sometimes scenes where this world of 'The Void' or what have you shows characters some of their dreams and tries to trick them with fulfilling their desires, and yet it's also not clear how they can do this and why it's only done to some of the characters. And moreover, if they could do mind-control, why doesn't the ultimate main Bad-Baddie get the pregnant woman to him sooner for what is ultimately an impregnation-incubus sort of plot? This is a lot of style that can often work though mostly in the use of practical effects, and I must emphasize that whoever did the effects deserves a free bar for a year for the amount of work put in here (though some of that reaction may be like a guy coming in from being in the CGI desert for so long, whether some of that is derivative too I'm not sure right after seeing it), and at the same time it's sizzle-no-steak.

I didn't go with high or low expectations since I didn't know much about the film, but that's usually a good thing I think: show me what you got and try to impress me with a vision that isn't encumbered by a franchise or a major studio breathing down your necks. The Void has its moments, but a lot of it is humorless and without charm (this really could've used, if one is going to go for the 'but its homaging Carpenter and Romero etc' argument like a Ken Foree or Kurt Russell or something, someone who can make me feel some concern for these people), and at worst it may be all too impressed with its own half-baked imagery and context. 5.5/10

Read more IMDb reviews

16 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment